Special Reports

Adoption And Fostering Part One: DHHS Makes Plea For More Quality Foster Care Homes

Updated 1 year ago

May is National Foster Care Awareness Month.Officials with the Department of Health and Human Services say it’s critical to find more homes for children in the foster care system. As generations begin to age out of the foster care system in Maine, it starts to become evident how their struggles from within may set up their future, for better or for worse.The department’s goal now is to improve lives for the children growing up outside of their biological homes.”Right now, in care, we have about 1,800 children and over a third of them are between the ages of zero to three. So, that’s very telling about what’s happening in society, in terms of our babies are struggling to be taken care of, generally speaking,” said Therese Cahill-Low.As the director of the Office of Child and Family Services, she sees firsthand how difficult placement can be.”If you can imagine being picked up, being in your home one day, and then, literally, being picked up, and moved to a place that you don’t know anyone. I often try to remember that when I’m working with these children, because I can’t imagine transitioning smoothly. They are in a place that is not home, and they were put there by someone else, and they had no choice in the matter,” said Cahill-Low.She says placing younger children can be a little more successful.”But, the older children, generally who have been burned by family, and by foster families, don’t want to do that again. And, so for us, we’re trying to figure out what can we provide for a safe place. And that’s really our challenge right now in determining, this isn’t good. I don’t want this many children not to have a safe place to be and trying to figure out how we can provide some kind of setting in which they can go to that’s not a homeless shelter, that’s not couch surfing, that’s not on the streets,” said Cahill-Low.The challenge is finding more quality homes for children entering the foster care system.”The foster parents, we ask if they’re interested, if they would like to take on a child. They can determine what age, how severe the needs. We have ranging obviously, some children, who come into care, have significant medical needs, or behavioral challenge. The foster parents would contact our office, or their local DHHS office, and indicate that they are interested in being a foster parent,” said Cahill-Low.They’re making a plea to anyone that may be interested.”The more variety, the better, because the more opportunity we have to place children in the best match. We have young couples, we have single people, we have older couples, or older individuals. It doesn’t matter if you’re married, or single, or partnering with someone else. We’ll take anyone that wants to give a loving home to a child,” said Cahill-Low.Michael Augustine grew up in the system. Because of attachment issues, he was in 31 homes throughout his youth.”In that time, I had some really awful foster homes. I had abusive homes, neglectful homes. But, I also had some really great homes that would have been terrific foster homes for other kids. But, because of that attachment issue, I could not attach to them, so I continued to act out, and I continued to push people away,” said Augustine.Augustine was adopted at age 23, now has a family of his own and has received his Master’s degree in social work.”For me, I have seen what it was like to live with my biological family as a young adult, and know if I stayed living with them, I would not be where I am today. So, for me, the foster care system saved my life, and it has allowed me to a successful young adult,” said Augustine.Knowing it’s a never-ending cycle that can use constant improvement is his motivation to help improve the system.”I wanted to work with foster children and show them that they can succeed. Yes, they have barriers. Some are going to be a lot harder to overcome than others. But, they can do it,” said Augustine.The department says that they want anyone interested to know that taking a child in will be a challenge, but with those challenges, come rewards.Finding life-long connections for those in their adult years is another need that they are finding with the older generation.If you would like to find out more information about fostering or mentoring, you are urged to call your local DHHS office.You can also visit maine.gov/dhhs.

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Penquis: Round Table Discussion

Updated 1 year ago

Pricilla Perry talks about inviting folks to take part of a round table discussion about issues facing teens in our community!The event will take place on May 16th at 2:30 at Penquis. (262 Harlow St.)   ·         Data shows that Maine teens are at significant risk for teen pregnancy, STDs, sexual violence, and harassment ·         Penquis Health Services has heard from a number of school personnel who have voiced concerns regarding the risk taking behaviors of youth, the misinformation and lack of information that youth have regarding STDs and risk of pregnancy, and the lack of resources in the schools to address sexual behaviors.  ·         Many students feel pressured to engage in sexual activity because they don’t know how to say no or say no in a confident, informed way.  ·         In an effort to address these issues, Penquis Health Services has scheduled roundtable discussions to engage the community in sharing problems and working together to identify solutions.  ·         The ultimate goal is to increase education, support and services available to youth around sexual health issues so that youth make informed and healthy decisions. ·         We are also inviting folks to share their concerns, issues and possible solution to help teens at risk on the Penquis  Facebook page either as a post on the wall or a private message.  Those comments will be added to the round table discussion!

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I Love My Pet May 6, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Do you want to feature your pet on our station?To do so: Just send us a picture. E-mail it to WABI at wabi@wabi.tv. Please put “Attention I Love My Pet” in the subject line.Or slip it in the mail. send to WABI TV5, Attention I Love My Pet, 35 Hildreth Street, Bangor 04401. If you’d like your picture back, include a self addressed, stamped envelope.Kennebec Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week: Meet AngelinaAngelinaAge: 1-2 Years OldBreed: Domestic Short HairGender: FemaleHi, I’m Angelina! I was brought in to KVHS by my owner because I was a bit too playful, and a bit of a troublemaker. I was a really great sport with getting my vet work done, and am very playful and friendly! I also am a lap cat at times, and ooze with affection if you pet me!Thank you! For more information contact:Kennebec Valley Humane Society626-3491 or go to:”http://www.pethavenlane.org”>www.pethavenlane.org

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Senior Watch May 6, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Lori Parham, State Director of AARP Maine, talks about Chained CPI and how it will effect seniors.For more information call Eastern Area Agency on Aging 800-432-7812 or e-mail www.eaaa.org


Peer Mentors Promote Mental Health

Terry Stackhouse

Updated 1 year ago

In tough economic times for Maine schools, one has found a way to support struggling teens at no additional cost. Through a pilot program at the University of Maine, nine students at Piscataquis Community Secondary School are now certified mentors for middle and high school students. As educators in Guilford struggle with the burden of tight budgeting, administrators say this free program is making a world of difference and could potentially save lives.”We don’t have the time. It is mainly a putting out fire type of approach,” explained guidance director Eric Steeves. Budget cuts and increased responsibilities put rural Maine counselors in a tough spot. More often than not, academic programs win out at the budget table, which leaves limited resources to deal with teenage mental health issues. Superintendent Paul Stearns asked, “If that student is suffering from depression or any other mind altering factors, how are they to be expected to learn?” A unique program at Piscataquis Community Secondary School in Guilford has found a way to ease the strain on their sole guidance counselor, at no cost to them. “I’m pretty good with the students so I got recommended and then I just went to training,” said Junior Kyla Desmarias. A pilot program designed by an intern at the University of Maine has certified 9 of their students as peer mentors and so far, it is working. “It means a lot to me because there’s not always very many people that are able to understand what a child my age is going through,” explained Autumn Tobbee, an 8th grade mentee. “It is not just how do you feel about this, it is you have to ask a lot of open ended questions to try to get them to give you more than just a one word answer. It is a lot harder than you would think,” said Danielle Spaulding, a junior mentor. During a one day crash course, educators shared basic skills on how to help ease the burden of a busy mind. “There was role playing, there were segments on multi-culturalism, confidentiality, active listening skills, I was just very impressed,” said Steeves. Still the stakes of some situations are too great to handle alone. “In the first week, I did have a peer counselor come to me with a concern about a student.” “If it is harmful then we will go to a trusted adult and they will get you some help,” added Spaulding. In March, administrators faced an escalating challenge of what they describe as gang related activity in the school. For a group of middle school aged boys, a case of cyber bullying left the computer screen and entered the hallways. “People get shoved a lot and they get verbally and physically assaulted,” said Tobbe. “Grabbed him in a headlock, chocking headlock and it was broken up,” said Stearns. It was a situation mitigated through the temporary presence of the local Sheriff’s Department, and the open ears of peer mentors concerned with bullying. Tobbe talked about her bout with depression saying, “It really feels painful emotionally because you never know what the future has to hold so it’s like sometimes you don’t know am I ever going to get help or am I ever going to get through this?” Administrators are committed to avoiding a contentious climate, and think the eyes and ears this program provides could prevent a tragedy like December’s in Newtown, Connecticut. “This type of program has the potential to uncover a situation like that before it even comes to light. The student’s message to bullies is a clear one. At one point then gathered in front of the WABI camera crew and exclaimed “Just don’t do it!”

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Wellness: Mother’s Day

Updated 1 year ago

Mary Lavanway is a dietician with Hannaford. She joined Jim Morris on TV5 News at 5 with some healthy ideas for Mother’s Day.Baked Apple-Cinnamon French ToastServings: 12Total time: 9 ½ hours (this includes 8 hours of refrigeration time)Ingredients3 cups “My Essentials” nonfat milk2 cups “My Essentials” liquid egg whites3 tablespoons Natures Place Organic Honey1-½ teaspoons McCormick Vanilla extract¼ teaspoon McCormick salt1 1-pound loaf of Natures Place Whole Wheat bread1 cup chopped dried apples. (3 ounces)½ cup Natures Place Organic raisins1-½ teaspoons McCormick ground cinnamon½ teaspoon McCormick ground nutmeg1 tablespoon “My Essentials” confectioners’ sugarPreparation1. Whisk milk, egg whites, honey, vanilla and salt in a large bowl.2. Trim crusts off 8 bread slices and set aside. Cut the crusts and remaining bread into 1-inch pieces. Toss with dried apples, raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg in another bowl.3. Coat a 9-by-13 inch baking pan with cooking spray. Transfer the bread mixture to the pan. Lay the reserved crust less slices evenly on top, trimming to fit. Whisk the milk mixture one more time, then pour evenly over the bread. Press the bread down with the back of a wooden spoon, making sure it’s evenly moist. Cover with parchment paper, then foil, and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours.4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F5. Bake the casserole, covered for 40 minutes. Uncover and continue baking until puffed, set and lightly browned, about 20 minutes more. Let stand for 10 minutes: dust with confectioners’ sugar and serve.Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 3 and refrigerate for up to 1 dayNutrition per serving: 183 calories: 1 g Fat: 0 g Sat: 1 g Mono: 1 mg Cholesterol: 33g Carbohydrates: 10 g Protein: 4 g Fiber: 344 mg Sodium: 312 mg Potassium.

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Maine Mothers Fight for Suicide Prevention

Terry Stackhouse

Updated 1 year ago

A newly passed state mandate will soon provide an easier pathway for students in crisis. Now anyone receiving a paycheck from a public high school is required to undergo a course in suicide prevention. Last week that one issue united both branches of the Maine state legislature and Governor LePage. The cost for state-wide education is an estimated $44,000 annually, but to the mothers supporting this legislation, knowing their work could save lives is priceless. “Everyone has now voted. The chair will close the vote,” said Maine Speaker of the House Mark Eves. “I find that it is the most important bill that I have ever presented and I can’t see any other bill being more important than this one,” said Rep. Paul Gilbert of Jay. An Act to Increase Suicide Awareness and Prevention in Maine Public Schools is a work of passion for Paul Gilbert. “This bill is so important. The life of youngsters is so important that this is one bill that should be supported regardless.”The Democratic State Representative is sponsoring legislation that would require school employees to undergo training in suicide prevention. An education that mothers of suicide victims say could have saved their child’s life. “I missed the signs. I missed the opportunity to save him and I think he got into this place of hopelessness, he felt hapless, and he felt that it was just, he couldn’t get there,” said Grace Eaton of Livermore falls. In 1997 she lost her son to suicide. Now she’s fighting alongside Gilbert for LD 609 to pass. “As a parent who has lost a child, this is the most devastating thing that has happened and can happen to a family, to a community, to your friends, to have you take your life,” said Eaton.In March, a 13-year-old student at Mount View Middle School in Thorndike took her own life, prompting a community forum to learn about the signs of suicide, and how to cope with the pain.”Are you okay, are you feeling suicidal? I would not be afraid to say that word,” said Cheryl Morin, a guest speaker who lost her son to suicide. “I sometimes say it is like taking CPR. Why not have the knowledge in case you need it.” “Suicide prevention is an important topic for families to really understand that usually in any circumstance of suicide, there have been some red flags. There has been something that has occurred prior to the actual event that people only afterwards talk about,” said Heather Perry, Superintendent of RSU 3. But those red flags aren’t always easy to catch. That’s why Nancy Thompson of Cape Elizabeth supported Gilbert’s bill. She hopes the “gate-keeper” training will help school officials pick up on signs that could prevent the unthinkable. “And I wasn’t afraid to go ahead and speak out about it and I’m not. And I say to people that I am going to go to my grave speaking about it because if I can save one kid, I’ve done my job,” said Thompson. Last month, both the Maine House and Senate unanimously passed LD 609, and with Governor LePage’s signature, it became law. “The bill has been passed to be enacted as a mandate,” said Maine House Speaker Mark Eves. “If we save one child in every school across the state of Maine, we have saved thousands of kids,” said Eaton, holding back tears. Thompson added, “I couldn’t save Timmy. But I may be able to save lots of kids along the way.”

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I Love My Pet: April 29, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Do you want to feature your pet on our station?To do so: Just send us a picture. E-mail it to WABI at wabi@wabi.tv. Please put “Attention I Love My Pet” in the subject line.Or slip it in the mail. send to WABI TV5, Attention I Love My Pet, 35 Hildreth Street, Bangor 04401. If you’d like your picture back, include a self addressed, stamped envelope.Kennebec Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week: Meet MorganHello, my name is Morgan and I am a 4 year old Mountain Cur Mix. I was returned to KVHS due to some issues I had with training and such (feel free to call or email KVHS with any questions regarding this!) and am a bit scared about being here. I really would require an experienced owner so that my new home can be my permanent home! I’m kind of a nervous guy anyway and would like a home without children or at least only older ones. I like other dogs but am reactive to them if they act aggressively toward me. I can’t be in a home with cats because I am sure that they are meant to eat! I will need a home with lots of patience and but I have plenty of love to give in return! I really want to be loved but I have never really learned how. Please come in soon so we can start a new journey together!PS: I LOVE toys and playing- I hope if you adopt me, you’ll keep a great toy supply! :-)Register now for Paws in the Park and the 20th Annual Mutt Strut taking place on Saturday, May 18th at the Buker Community Center in Augusta. Put together a team from your work place, your neighborhood, or your family and help raise money for KVHS! For more information, contact director@pethavenlane.org . For more information contact:Kennebec Valley Humane Society626-3491 or go to:”http://www.pethavenlane.org”>www.pethavenlane.org

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Senior Watch April 29, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Ken Banks for EAAA, talks about seniors and pets. · Seniors love to take their pets but watch the warm weather. Do not bring your pets in the car and leave them there. The vehicles heat up quickly and can kill the animals.· There are now “house-call” vets for seniors who have trouble getting their pets to the veterinarian. Go to www.housecallvets.org for a list of providers.· Studies have shown that pets help seniors with their physical and mental well-being· And when thinking of getting a pet, a senior should get an animal that matches their lifestyle. For instance, if an active senior loves walking and hiking, an active dog might fit the bill. However, an older cat who like to sleep on a warm lap would be perfect for a more sedentary senior.

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Behind The Badge – Bangor PD K9 Patrol Units

Wayne Harvey

Updated 1 year ago

Police officers are trained to use a number of tools to help them do their jobs, including dogs.The Bangor Police Department has 5 K9′s they use, three at the airport, and two on patrol.The officer and the dog spend 24 hours a day together, and can be called out to a wide variety of scenarios.They always have to be ready, for anything.”It’s physically hard, training is hard, it’s a lot of time you put in a lot of time,” said Sgt. Rob Angelo, “But it is very rewarding.”The role of the officer and their K9 partner varies from call to call.”We could do, go right from tracking a suspect right to a guy on the street calling me saying, hey can you walk your dog around a vehicle, so, and then looking for drugs,” said Officer Jason Linkletter. “So we could be doing patrol work and then jump right into drug work.””It’s a fantastic tool,” said Sgt. Angelo. “You saw something today and what they can do in a minute would take an officer hours to search bags the way we did. They can run that dog over these 12 bags in a few seconds and know whether there is or is not drugs in there””Another reason we want the dog is for officer protection,” said Officer Linkletter. “We don’t want the dog to let his guard down, just because, whoever it is, really his loyalty is to me.”Regular training sessions are held to keep not only the dog, but the officer sharp.”I’d like to train the handlers,” said Sgt. Angelo, who used to work with a K9 partner until his recent promotion. “That’s my goal to train those handlers so that they see that when they are on the street, they can see the situation unfold, ‘I’ve been here before, I’ve seen this, I know why my dog is doing this’ so we try to recreate these situations here so that they see them on the road and they can say ‘Yes I’ve seen this before, I know what I’m doing’” And Linkletter agrees on who likely getting more out of the training sessions. “Probably more for me than it is for the dog, cause the dog already knows what his job is. It’s just I have to learn to be able to read the dog and make sure I’m understanding the dog’s behavior, and really clueing in on that.”Sometimes the training is very technical, relating to police work. Other times it’s not.”Sometimes I just have to teach the handlers how to play with the dog, how to get that reaction so that dog knows when I smell this ‘Great Things Happen’ well I have to train the handler to make great things happen for that dog,” said Angelo.When the dog locates a scent, whether it’s a person, an item, or drugs, they react either passively or aggressively. It’s based on their training. The passive dogs will sit or lay down when they find something.”With my dog, he’s an aggressive find dog, which means, with luggage or whatever it might be, he’s going to go at that source and try to get it out” said Linkletter, who works with a 4 and a half year old German Shepard named Lex. “He might bark, he might jump up, he might scratch, like luggage he might bite at it.””That’s why it’s important to know your dog in that, does your, if your dog is an aggressive alert dog, does that dog do that for anything else? And that is why we train this dog, will only go active aggression like we saw, when he smells drugs, nothing else will make him do that,” said Sgt Angelo.Because of the dog’s training and their remarkable sense of smell, they can discern what is in a room and what specifically they are supposed to find, according to Angelo. “They can pick out individual scents, I heard recently, it described as when you walk in you smell stew, a dog smells, celery and salt and pepper and water and meat. That dog knows each individual smell, and if there is also marijuana in the room, he smells that as well, and that is what he is going to go to.”

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Behind The Badge – Airport K9 Unit Of Bangor PD

Wayne Harvey

Updated 1 year ago

24 hours a day, seven days a week police departments across the state and across the nation are working to keep us safe.From home, to work, to school and everywhere in between they are there on the lookout.And it’s not just humans, dogs are part of the force.The Bangor Police Department has three officers and three dogs patroling the airport.”We work specifically explosive detection here at the Bangor International Airport,” said Officer Dan Scripture, who has been with the K9 unit at the airport for the entire five years of the program.It is not as simple as wanting to work with a K9. These officers went through nearly three months of training in Texas, and then a dog was chosen to fit their personalities so both dog and man can succeed. “We have to have classes on explosives, we have to have classes on animal care, classes on animal behavior,” said Scripture. “And then you have to go work with your dog on a daily basis, and then someone has to instruct you on how to properly work that dog. The dogs are pretty well trained when you get there.”After the pairing is made, they are partners around the clock.”The dog comes home with me, he’s with me pretty much 24/7, 24 hours a day that dog is with me, he is very attached to me so to speak” said Scripture of his 9 year old Belgian Malinois, Endumin. “I am the only one that really bonded with him down at Lackland AFB that’s how it was tailored, that’s how it was meant to be.””It’s still a partner,” said Officer Jeff Small, who has also spent the last 5 years patrolling BIA with a K9 partner. “You know we work together just like on the road, and we look out for each other and I rely on him and he relies on me.”Early morning flights, late night arrivals, the officers and dogs work around the airport, and they cover every inch of it, from the bag check-in, to the carousel, to the passenger screening areas, the seating, and even out onto the Tarmac, and they are always working. “We have to be able to get ready to move and go get an unattended bag, be able to have a task of searching bags, so you’re going to have to be able to be quick and portable with the dog as well,” said Scripture. “We go everywhere there is nowhere these dogs really don’t go, my dog is extremely portable he is very durable, he is rough and tumble and there is no environment, from snow, rain, nothing seems to bother him, he doesn’t get distracted and he doesn’t mind loud noises””You don’t always need to tell him to work,” said Small of his 7 year old Black Lab Jovic. “Cause he is working, he may not look like he’s working but his nose is always going.”Because they never know where they are going to be or what they are going to be doing, they train constantly.”we try to train using different objectives each time whether it’s bags or cars or terminal, each time you try to think up a different scenario,” said Scripture. “You have to give them something to work for and they have to be hard wired eventually to find things and know that they find things in this environment, and know that they find things on an airplane, that they find things in cars, cause they will search and dogs are really smart and they remember”The dogs are expensive and so is their training, but they work pretty cheap, wanting just praise, love and fun in return, said Scripture. “They’ll work for that, that is their pay. My dog will work all day, there is no food in there, it’s just the toy, it’s the reward, I say that it’s just a reward, but to him it is everything, he identifies with that as a playful experience, they remember it and they thrive for it”The toys are their pay check because the dogs, just like people, need to enjoy what they are doing every day. “You want your dog to be happier when they come in to work,” said Scripture. “If you have a working dog, so they’ll be eager to come in there as well.”While the dogs may look or act friendly, and you may want to pet them, they are working Police Dogs and should be left alone and allowed to do their jobs.

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SPCA Pet of the Week: Meet Hank

Updated 1 year ago

Laurie Pierce, Shelter Manager from the S-P-C-A of Hancock County talks about HankHank is a 5 year old Pointer mix. He’s extremely friendly and eager to please. Hank will even smile for us. He’s a pleasure to be around. He weighs in at 60 lbs. Although he’s a bigger dog Hank is easy to handle.Do you have room in your home for Hank???For more information on Peanut at the SPCA in Trenton call 667-8088 or check out: www.spcahancockcounty.org

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Wellness: Sports Nutrition

Wayne Harvey

Updated 1 year ago

Mary Lavanway is a dietician with Hannaford. She joined Jim Morris on TV5 News at 5 with some information about sports nutrition.


Wellness Wednesday: Earth Day Inspired Recipe

Updated 1 year ago

Mary Lavanway is a dietician with Hannaford she shares a recipe idea inspired by Earth Day.Mixed Berry Granola Crunch CrumbleActive time: 15 minutesTotal time: 1hour and 15 minutesServes 6-8Ingredients 8 cups Wyman’s quick-frozen mixed berries 3 tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca ¼ cup Maine maple syrup ½ teaspoon grated lemon zest ` ¾ cups Hannaford all-purpose flour 1/3 cup Hannaford dark-brown sugar 1/3 cup Hannaford granulated sugar 1 teaspoon McCormick ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon McCormick ground ginger 1-cup butter, melted 1 cup Grandy Oats Classic Granola Inspirations Authentic Italian mixed berry GelatoDirections Preheat oven to 350 degrees F Toss mixed berries with tapioca, maple syrup and lemon zest Set aside In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugars and spices Stir in butter: coarse crumbs will form Blend granola into crumb mixture Pour fruit filling into 8-inch pan Pour crumb mixture evenly over fruit Bake until topping is lightly golden, about 55 minutes Let cool slightly Serve with a small scoop of Inspirations Authentic Italian mixed berry Gelato

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Mind Your Own Business: Marketing Maine Artisans

Updated 1 year ago

There are plenty of creative people in Maine who can use support marketing their arts and crafts. In this “Mind Your Own Business,” Deb Neuman joined Carolyn Callahan on TV5 News at 5 to help.Marketing Maine ArtisansMaine Made Programmainemade.orgMaine Crafts Associationmainecraftsassociation.org The Maine Crafts Guildmainecraftsguild.comUnited Maine Craftsmenmainecraftsmen.orgFind out more tips on how to Mind Your Own Business:www.debneuman.com

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Senior Watch April 22, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Meg Callaway from the Charlotte White Center, talks about a conference she is holding regarding people with developmental disabilities who develop dementia later in life.For more information call Eastern Area Agency on Aging 800-432-7812 or e-mail www.eaaa.org

Read more on Senior Watch April 22, 2013…


I Love My Pet, April 22, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Do you want to feature your pet on our station?To do so: Just send us a picture. E-mail it to WABI at wabi@wabi.tv. Please put “Attention I Love My Pet” in the subject line.Or slip it in the mail. send to WABI TV5, Attention I Love My Pet, 35 Hildreth Street, Bangor 04401. If you’d like your picture back, include a self addressed, stamped envelope.Kennebec Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week: Meet DestinyHello, I’m Destiny. I am a 1-year old, spayed female and am up to date on routine vaccinations!! I am a quiet kitty, but once I get to know you, I love to be pet! I thoroughly enjoy catnip, and would love you forever if you gave me a wonderful home.Register now for Paws in the Park and the 20th Annual Mutt Strut taking place on Saturday, May 18th at the Buker Community Center in Augusta. Put together a team from your work place, your neighborhood, or your family and help raise money for KVHS!For more information contact:Kennebec Valley Humane Society626-3491 or go to:”http://www.pethavenlane.org”>www.pethavenlane.org

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Annual Walk for Autism

Updated 1 year ago

The annual walk for autism is just a little over a week away.Heather Wheaton of Penquis Autism Community services joined us in our studio to talk about it.


Senior Watch: April 15, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

In Senior Watch, Kristie Miner with Kindred Westgate joined Carolyn Callahan on TV5 News at Noon to talk about the Eastern Maine Walk to End Alzheimer’s.Dirigo PinesFor more information:1-800-432-7812 or www.eaaa.org

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I Love My Pet: April 15, 2013

Updated 1 year ago

Do you want to feature your pet on our station?To do so: Just send us a picture. E-mail it to WABI at wabi@wabi.tv. Please put “Attention I Love My Pet” in the subject line.Or slip it in the mail. send to WABI TV5, Attention I Love My Pet, 35 Hildreth Street, Bangor 04401. If you’d like your picture back, include a self addressed, stamped envelope.Kennebec Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week: Meet OzzHello, I am Ozz, and I am a 6 year old goofball! I love to play and can be a little rambunctious at times, but that’s what a lot of people love about me! I am also curious and like to be affectionate at times.Join us for our 2nd Annual Bowl-A-Thon at 1-7-10 Bowling and Entertainment Center Splitters Sports Bar and Grille on April 13, 2013 from 12:00pm until 5:00pm. Gather pledges and help us raise money for the nearly 2,500 homeless animals that we take in each year at the Kennebec Valley Humane Society! Please contact Amanda at (207) 626-3491 ext. 107 or email volunteer@pethavenlane.org for more information and to obtain a pledge sheet! Pledge sheets can also be picked up at 1-7-10 Bowling & Entertainment Center in Augusta. Call Ron at (207) 621-1710. For more information contact:Kennebec Valley Humane Society626-3491 or go to:www.pethavenlane.org

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