News

The Maine Institute in Bangor is Attracting and Retaining Talented, Young Workers

Updated 5 years ago

The Maine Institute in Bangor plays a crucial role in the medical field.It’s also attracting, and retaining, a lot of talented young workers.Meghan Hayward takes us inside.”We do what’s called exploratory clinical research and what that basically is is translating scientific information into medical applications.”Claire Deselle of the Maine Institute in Bangor says the focus here is on chronic diseases, particularly cancer.”We can’t cover all of cancer but we do have some specific areas where we have expertise and resources that we can leverage that gives us a unique advantage.”Another unique aspect of the research center is that more than half the staff are under forty.”A couple of things are exciting about having a young staff. For one thing you have a lot of enthusiasm and energy and a lot of fresh ideas. Another thing there’s always been a concern that there’s been a brain drain out of the state of Maine and we hope we are doing a small part to bring talent back or keep good local talent.”Ryan Lynch is a research assistant at the Maine Institute.He is originally from Maine and received his bachelor and master degrees from the University of Maine.Lynch says he’s happy to work in his home state.”It’s really great knowing that we’re working on relevant and important research here.”The Maine Institute collaborates with the University of Maine.Which is something Lynch says benefits the students and the institute too.”To have this type of equipment at this institute so close to the university it really allows us to do some really incredible, in depth research that otherwise wouldn’t be happening.”Deselle says the state of Maine is at an advantage with the type of research taking place here.She says the institute’s capabilities will continue to grow.”In terms of economic development is to actually see some of the work we do become adopted eventually into medical practice and some of the work become spin-offs and form new businesses here in healthcare and bio-medical world.”

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CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent Bob Schieffer in Maine for Gala

Updated 5 years ago

A legendary journalist is spending the evening on the coast of Maine for a good cause.Bob Schieffer, host of “Face the Nation,” is the featured speaker at a gala in Rockland.Schieffer has been with CBS news for 40 years…and has won just about every award in the business.Amy Erickson had the chance to talk to Schieffer in Thomaston.”I’m one of those lucky people that got to do what he wanted to do when he was a little boy. I’ve had a great life and a lot of fun.”CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent Bob Scheiffer says this trip to Maine is certainly more pleasant than his first time here…during a Presidential primary in the dead of winter, back in the 80s…”I’ll always remember standing beside this frozen lake with snow in the background and I had this big parka on and it looked like an eskimo. Best picture of the whole story was me standing in that parka.”Schieffer was invited back to Maine this time to be the guest speaker and gala honoree at a celebration for Thomaston’s Henry Knox Museum.He’ll spend the evening at the Strand Theatre in Rockland, signing copies of his latest book and speaking about his 52 years in the news business.The host of “Face the Nation” is one of only a handful of journalists who’ve covered all four major beats in Washington…The White House, Pentagon, Capitol Hill and The State Department.He’s the recipient of seven Emmys…and has covered every presidential campaign since 1972.Schieffer says without a doubt, the most exciting and interesting was in 2008.He earned rave reviews from his peers after moderating the final debate between Barack Obama and John McCain.It’s a moment in his career he’ll never forget.”We were all seated at the same table. I could reach out and touch them and let me tell you, you had to slice through some pretty heavy tension in the air. It was pretty clear they didn’t like each other very much. But I mean, how could they at that point in the campaign?””From the standpoint of just intellectual challenge and downright fun, moderating one of those debates is just the most fun you could possibly have.”During his talk, Schieffer plans to address the current state of American journalism…it’s a subject close to his heart.He says he sees a dangerous trend developing…especially when it comes to online news, since, as Schieffer says, there’s no editor involved.”The worst newspaper has somebody on the staff who knows where the stuff comes from. Things appear on the web and you don’t know if they’re true, if they’re false, you don’t know where they came from.””The value of mainstream journalism is that the stories have been vetted. We still do it the traditional way. We don’t publish or broadcast something unless we think it’s true. Those are not the standards in a big part of the web.”

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State Workers Prepare for Another Shutdown Day

Updated 5 years ago

Maine state workers are gettting ready for another state government shutdown day on Friday. Friday marks the second of 20 shutdown days included in the spending blueprint approved by Governor John Baldacci and the Legislature. But there are several key exemptions. State ferries will remain in operation, game wardens and other law enforcement officers will be on patrol, and Maine state parks and historic sites will remain open and staffed. The $5.8 billion general fund budget freezes state employee merit and longevity pay in addition to the shutdown days. It also requires state workers to begin making contributions toward their health insurance. (AP)

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Librarians Get Resourceful During Loan Shutdown

Updated 5 years ago

Until last month, on any given day, there were about six thousand items being transported between libraries in the state – the requests of people doing research, or tracking down particular books.But the service has come to a sudden halt, leaving many folks frustrated.”We have at the Belfast Free Library about 50 thousand items on our shelves,” says director Steve Norman. “But there are about 9-million items available statewide you can request.”Norman says until recently, every month they would lend and borrow about 3 thousand books, movies, and other resources from libraries around the state through the interlibrary loan program.”It was working very well,” says reference librarian Betsy Paradis. “People would make their requests and within a couple of days or over a weekend their items would be here. They were really happy. So its been tough without it.”When a new delivery vendor terminated their contract unexpectedly in July the program came to a halt, leaving items piled up around the state.”It’s hard. We hate to leave people hanging,” she says.They say everyone from children to serious researchers used the system.”You can have almost any library in the state of Maine deliver something to your hometown library just like that,” says John Clayton, who has been using the system for years. “It’s been a real inconvenience, I think, that’s it’s been down lately.”Dean Corner with the Maine State Library says they’re working hard to sign a new delivery contract in the next few weeks, but at the very least the shutdown has illustrated how many people in the state rely on the loan service.”Every day, we have a stream of people asking us if interlibrary loan is working again,” Norman says at the Belfast Free Library. “So there really is a strong sense of dismay and disappointment that it isn’t working now.”Until the program is up and running again, they’ll be taking matters into their own hands.”We librarians are resourceful,” Paradis says. “We’ve been doing deliveries ourselves to try and make up for it.”

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Cote Indicted on Multiple Charges

Updated 5 years ago

An Ellsworth man accused of breaking into a man’s home in Bar Barbor and with breaking into cars has also been indicted.22-year-old Scott Cote is accused of entering a home on Cleftstone road around 4 in the morning.Police say the homeowner woke up and convinced Cote to leave after giving him a non-alcoholic beer.Charges against Cote include burglary, theft, criminal trespass, driving after losing his license and violating conditions of release.

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Blue Hill Man Indicted for Sex Crime

Updated 5 years ago

A Blue Hill man has been indicted for yet another sex crime.50-year-old Theodore Stanislaw was indicted earlier this year for multiple sex charges for things that allegedly took place in 2004.The more recent charge is unlawful sexual contact for something he’s accused of doing in July 2006.

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Bucksport Man Charged with Gross Sexual Assault

Updated 5 years ago

31-year-old Victor Ireland of Bucksport has been charged with gross sexual assault and five counts of unlawful sexual contact.Authorities say the crimes were committed in Bucksport between July of last year and May of this year.

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Blue Hill Man Indicted on a Sex Charge

Updated 5 years ago

And the Hancock County Grand Jury has indicted a Blue Hill man on a sex charge.50-year-old Theodore Stanislaw is accused of unlawful sexual contact for something police say took place in july 2006.Earlier this year he was indicted for multiple sex charges for things he’s accused of doing in 2004.

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Ellsworth Man Formally Charged in Deadly Car Crash

Updated 5 years ago

An Ellsworth man has been formally charged in a deadly car crash.Police say 33-year old Anthony Robbins was drunk and driving too fast when he crashed a car into a telephone pole on Reach Road in Deer Isle in January.A passenger, 47-year-old Lisa Martin of Ellsworth, was killed.Charges against Robbins include manslaughter and aggravated criminal OUI.

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World War II Veteran Receives High School Diploma

Updated 5 years ago

A Bangor man who had waited a long, long time for his high school diploma is waiting no longer.He’s a World War II veteran who, just today, graduated.Meghan Hayward has his story.” I never thought I’d get it, I dreamed of it.”Charles Colburn is talking about his high school diploma.He was drafted into World War II, so he never got it.That is until now, on his eighty-seventh birthday.”Most wonderful thing that ever happened.”Even after holding the diploma in his hands he says it’s hard to believe.”But I said I’ve got to get it. So I did. I come over and I said by golly I will.”His daughter Jane Helsley along with her husband and daughter were at the ceremony.jane says her dad could not be happier.”So to him it’s kind of like a piece of a missing puzzle. He’s done a lot in his life but he always felt there was a little missing and this was it.”So where will the diploma go?”My whole wall is all the certificates and everything I’ve received over the years. And I got a special place right in the middle. It’s not going to one side it’s going right in the middle. I got it all picked out.”And how will he feel every day he walks by that wall and sees his high school diploma?”Each day it’s going to make me feel a little bit better. Because when people say you graduated? Yes I graduated. I’ll be proud.”

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Jackson Lab Breaks Ground On New Facility

Rob Poindexter

Updated 5 years ago

Wednesday the folks at Jackson Lab broke ground on a new facility to advance their research with mice. The state is picking up half the cost and lab officials say it wouldn’t have happened without that.The building will be used to freeze mice embryos for later use as well as prepare other mice for research at the lab. Jackson Lab had hit a rough patch financially but seems to have turned the corner, and lab officials say the new facility should help them further stimulate the local economy. “We’ll employ probably, at the end of the day, 100 people in the building,” says CEO/VP Chuck Hewett, “that’s 100 jobs, folks that pay income tax, spend money in town, we make payroll in 70 different zip codes in the state of Maine so we think it spreads around pretty well.”

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Rumford Shooting: Person of Interest’s Sketch Released

Updated 5 years ago

State Police have released a sketch of a man wanted in connection with a double murder Monday night.Police say he’s about six feet tall, in his twenties, has shoulder-length black hair and may have been wearing gloves. They also say he may have changed his appearance.Witnesses at the scene reported seeing a man running away from the scene of the shootings.Authorities were called to the home on Pine Street Monday night.Inside, they found two men shot to death.22-year-old Victor Sheldon and 48-year-old Roger Day were both shot in the head.Anyone with information is asked to call State Police 1-800-228-0857.

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Environmental Project Attempts To Boost Economy In Hancock County

Rob Poindexter

Updated 5 years ago

The federal government is spending $200,000 to help potential property investors in Hancock County separate fact from fiction. “So the idea is you know there’s a lot of older industrial sites, gas stations sites, landfills etc. that people are afraid to invest in because of real or perceived environmental conditions,” says Glenn Daukas. Daukas is the project manager for Campbell Environmental Group who is spearheading the Brownfield Project. The mere perception of environmental issues can reduce the value and use of properties even if there are no issues present, and that can scare off investors. “The idea of this program is to identify these sites and do investigations on them to determine what are the true environmental risks associated with them,” says Daukas. Once the risks are determined they can either clean them up or let investors know the price tag of any needed cleanup. “It’s not an unknown,” Daukas adds, “it’s not some type of thing where they’re saying there used to be ethal-methal bad stuff here and we could be looking at $500,000 to $1 million in cleanup when in reality it may not need any cleanup or in fact a $25-$50,000 cleanup.”One site that is already being called a Brownfield success is Gordon’s Wharf in Sullivan. Tom Martin is the Executive Director of the Hancock County Planning Commission. “Gordon’s wharf was an old granite loading site and the town wishes to acquire it,” says Martin “using the grant money, as a public access to Taunton Bay in Sullivan.”Gordon’s Wharf is close to getting a clean bill of health from the Maine DEP and that has organizers of the project smiling. “That’s the goal of this entire program,” says Daukas, “to identify these sites, identify the risks, and get the property back into a viable economic use, whether it’s open green space, waterfront access, both are a success of this program.” >

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Glenburn Man Sentenced for Halloween Robbery

Catherine Pegram

Updated 5 years ago

A man from Glenburn who admitted to breaking into the Family Dollar Store in Brewer last Halloween night will spend a year behind bars. 20-year-old Charles Dion was sentenced today for robbery and theft by unauthorized taking. He was ordered to pay back more than 26-hundred dollars to the family dollar store, too.Dion will also serve a concurrent sentence for stealing and wrecking two trucks, along with some misdemeanor charges. Dion worked at the Family Dollar store and was one of four men who robbed the place.18-year-old Raeleigh Hill of Eddington, 20-year-old Jason Goodin of Holden and 19-year-old Jesse Hatch of Eddington are already serving time for the crime.

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Archaeology Dig at Fort Knox Reveals Clues to Past

Updated 5 years ago

Budding archaeologists are spending the week at Fort Knox in Prospect.A special field school is allowing amateurs to try their hands at digging for clues to the past.Amy Erickson has more.”A tremendous amount of history. You just have to find it.”That’s just what Faith Campbell intends to do.She and six other students are spending the week at Fort Knox’s second annual Archaeology Field School.It’s a chance for budding archaeologists to study under a master…and help dig up clues to the Fort’s past.They’re focusing on an old foundation near the Visitor Center.The spot once housed support buildings while the Fort was under construction.”My working idea is that this is the blacksmith shop. We found a number of artifacts that went along with that, including nailstock that was used to make nails…and other tools that make sense together only if they’re at the blacksmith shop.”Historical Archaeologist Peter Morrison is the project leader.He’s helped the students uncover everything from railroad spikes to buttons…even some old crockery.”It makes the history quite real when you find something that…the last person that held it was a blacksmith, this is where he dropped it…sometimes you get a really direct connection to that history.””It’s adding to the story of Fort Knox. There were many support buildings here. We don’t know where they were. There is, in fact, an undiscovered Fort Knox, so every time we do a field school, we’re discovering more about it and adding to the base of knowledge about Fort Knox.”Campbell, for one, wants to do her part to help others make that connection to Maine’s history.”So many of our history textbooks talk about Virginia and Massachusetts.””not a lot has been written about Maine history, or as much as we’d like.”

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Cookie Swap Recipes and Events

Updated 5 years ago

Julia Usher is the former owner of AzucArte, a boutique bakery known for its one-of-a-kind wedding cakes. Usher’s work has been featured in Vera Wang on Weddings, Modern Bride, Bride’s, and Elegant Bride.Now a freelance food writer and stylist, working from part-time residence in Stonington, Maine and also from St. Louis: Usher’s work has appeared in Bon Appétit, Fine Cooking, Better Homes and Gardens, Mary Engelbreit’s Home Companion, Gastronomica, and several other regional/local publicationsJulia dropped by our studios to tell us about her new book “Cookie Swap: Creative Treats to Share Throughout the Year.” She shared some upcoming events, and a couple recipes!For more information check out Julia’s website: www.juliausher.com”Cookie Swap” Events:Blue Hill Library, Blue Hill, Aug. 6, 6:30-8:00pmStonington Farmers’ Market, Aug. 7, 9am-12pmgSherman’s Books & Stationery, Bar Harbor, Aug. 7, 7pm-9amBlue Hill Farmers’ Market, Aug. 8, 9am-11:30am Bookstacks, Bucksport, Aug. 8, 1-2pmThe Good Table, Belfast, Aug. 9, 2-4pmSherman’s Books & Stationery, Camden, Aug. 10, 1pm-3pmLeft Bank Books, Searsport, Aug. 11, 3-5:30pmRecipes:Top Dogs with Coffee Cream Filling Makes 2 – 2 1/2 dozen 2 1/2-inch sandwich cookiesHere’s another backyard barbeque look-alike that will make your summer party sizzle. To streamline the preparation, you can mix and bake the meringue “buns” up to 1 week ahead: then fill them right before you’re ready to dig in.Note: Though I think the bitter espresso powder in the filling is a necessary foil to the sweetness of the meringue “buns,” kids may not agree. For a more kid-friendly filling, increase the vanilla extract in Italian Buttercream to 1 tablespoon and substitute 2 ounces melted, cooled semisweet chocolate for the espresso powder in Step 6, below.Cookie Key:Complexity: MediumActive Time: 2 hoursType: Piped: sandwichPrep Talk: Store unfilled meringue “buns” in airtight containers at room temperature up to 2 weeks. Once filled, the cookies must be refrigerated. (The filling is perishable.) Store in airtight containers in the fridge up to 2 – 3 days. For best eating, serve at room temperature. Note: The “buns” will be quite crunchy to start. If you prefer a softer texture, allow the cookies to sit for 1 -2 days in the fridge before serving.Hazelnut Meringue “Buns”1 cup granulated sugar, divided3/4 cup chopped hazelnuts (with skins)2 tablespoons cornstarch4 large egg whites, room temperature1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar1/8 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon pure hazelnut or vanilla extract Coffee Buttercream Filling2 cups (about 1/2 recipe) Italian Buttercream (below), divided15 – 20 drops yellow liqua-gel food coloring 15 – 20 drops brown liqua-gel food coloring, divided 1 1/2 tablespoons instant espresso powder, dissolved in 1 teaspoon boiling water 1 – 2 drops red liqua-gel food coloring1. Prepare hazelnut meringue “buns”: Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat the oven to 300°F. (If you have two ovens, position racks in the middle and preheat both ovens. The cookies will bake more evenly in this configuration.) Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper and set aside.2. Combine 1/2 cup sugar, the hazelnuts, and cornstarch in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Process until the nuts are finely ground, but not pasty.3. Place the egg whites and cream of tartar in the clean bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a whip attachment. (Note: The bowl, whip attachment, and all mixing utensils should be completely free of fat, or the egg whites will not stiffen.) Beat on medium speed until frothy and add the salt. Continue to beat to firm peaks: then turn the mixer to medium-high speed and gradually add the remaining sugar. Quickly scrape down the sides of the bowl: then resume beating on high speed until the whites are stiff and glossy, about 1 – 2 minutes.4. Using a large rubber spatula, fold in the reserved nut mixture along with the hazelnut extract. Turn the meringue into a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip. Pipe 2 – 2 1/2 dozen small (3/4 x 2 1/4-inch) “buns” onto each of the prepared cookie sheets, spacing the cookies about 1 inch apart. Smooth any peaks in the meringue with a barely damp fingertip. (Note: There will be leftover batter: but if it isn’t baked immediately after piping, it will quickly lose volume.)5. Place both cookie sheets in the oven at the same time and bake 25 – 30 minutes, or until the cookies are crisp and lightly browned. To ensure even browning, rotate the cookie sheets from top to bottom rack, and vice versa, midway through baking. (Alternatively, place one cookie sheet in each of two ovens.) Immediately transfer the cookies to wire racks and cool completely before filling or storing.6. Mix the buttercream: It is best to make the buttercream just before you’re ready to assemble the cookies so it is at the ideal working consistency. (If made in advance, it must be refrigerated and then softened at room temperature to working consistency.) Mix 1/2 cup Italian Buttercream with the yellow food coloring and a drop of brown coloring to make the “mustard.” Combine the remaining 1 1/2 cups Italian Buttercream with the dissolved espresso powder (or 2 ounces melted premium semisweet chocolate for the kids) and whisk well. Deepen the color to a hot dog hue by adding the remaining brown and red food coloring. 7. Assemble the cookies: Fit a pastry bag with a 3/8-inch round tip and fill with the brown buttercream. Fit another pastry bag with a 1/8-inch round tip and fill with the yellow buttercream. Turn half of the cookies flat-side up. Using the first pastry bag, pipe a short (1/2 x 1 3/4-inch) “hot dog” along the length of each cookie. Top each “hot dog” with another “bun,” placed flat-side down, and gently press together. Turn the sandwiches on their sides so that the “hot dogs” are clearly visible from the top. Using the second pastry bag, pipe a squiggle of yellow buttercream on top of each “hot dog” to mimic a squirt of “mustard.” Italian ButtercreamMakes about 4 1/2 cups Unlike classic American buttercream, which consists primarily of butter and powdered sugar, this icing starts with whipped egg whites and ends up fluffy and light – ideal for cookie toppings and fillings.Notes: 1. Though the egg whites are heated in this recipe, pasteurized whites can be substituted to minimize the risk of food-borne illness associated with raw eggs. Use about 2 tablespoons pasteurized whites for every large white.2. If a recipe calls for any fraction of Italian Buttercream, it is best to make a full batch and portion off what you need, as the ingredient quantities below are too small to practically mix in any smaller quantity. Unused icing may be frozen for later use, as described below.Cookie Key:Complexity: MediumActive Time: ½ hourType: N/APrep Talk: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 1 week, or in the freezer up to 1 month. Once refrigerated or frozen, the icing must be softened to room temperature and re-beaten before use. 4 large egg whites, room temperature (or about 9 tablespoons pasteurized egg whites)1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar2/3 cup granulated sugar 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon light corn syrup 1 2/3 cups (3 sticks plus 2 2/3 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (increase to 1 tablespoon if you do not add other flavorings)Additional flavorings, as desired1. Combine the egg whites and cream of tartar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a whip attachment. (Note: The bowl, whip attachment, and all mixing utensils should be completely free of fat, or the egg whites will not stiffen.) Beat on medium speed to firm peaks.2. Meanwhile, combine the sugar and corn syrup in a large nonstick skillet and stir to evenly moisten the sugar. Place the mixture over medium-high heat and bring to a boil, stirring as needed to make sure the sugar completely dissolves. Continue to boil approximately 30 seconds, until thick, syrupy, and bubbly through to the center.3. Turn the mixer to medium-high speed and gradually add the hot sugar syrup in a slow, steady stream, with the mixer running. Once all of the syrup has been incorporated, quickly scrape down the sides of the bowl, taking care not to scrape any hard, crystallized sugar into the meringue. Resume beating at high speed until the meringue has cooled, about 7 – 10 minutes.4. Add the butter 2 tablespoons at time, beating well after each addition. (Note: The icing will initially deflate and look grainy, but will get quite thick and glossy as more butter is incorporated.)5. Add the vanilla extract and additional flavorings, as desired, and mix well.

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Two Lobster Boats Sunk On Purpose in Owls Head

Updated 5 years ago

Maine law enforcement officials say two lobster boats were intentionally sunk in Owls Head amid growing tensions among lobstermen two weeks after a lobster turf war escalated into a shooting on Matinicus Island.Marine Patrol Col. Joe Fessenden said lobstermen arriving to pull traps Wednesday morning discovered two boats were sunk and a third was half-sunk in Owls Head harbor.Fessenden said the half-sunk boat was brought to shore, where it was determined that a pipe had been cut inside the boat allowing ocean water to fill the boat’s bilge. Efforts were under way to lift the other boats from the harbor bottom.Both lobstermen involved in the Matinicus shooting have ties to the Owls Head area. But Fessenden says investigators have found no connection between the shooting and the sinkings.

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Ellsworth Man Indicted in Deadly Wreck in Deer Isle

Updated 5 years ago

A man from Ellsworth has been indicted by a Hancock County grand jury for a car crash in Deer Isle that killed his passenger. 33-year old Anthony Robbins is charged with manslaughter and aggravated criminal OUI, among other charges.He was driving south on Reach Road in Deer Isle back in January when he lost control of the vehicle and smashed into a telephone pole.47-year-old Lisa Martin of Ellsworth owned the car and was riding as a passenger. She was killed.Police say speed and alcohol were factors in the wreck.

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Westphal Nominated

Updated 5 years ago

A familiar face has been nominated to a top position in Washington.The U.S. Armed Services Committee says former University of Maine chancellor Joseph Westphal has been nominated to be undersecretary of the Army.Senator Susan Collins is a member of the committee.Westphal’s nomination will now be considered by the full Senate.Westphal stepped down as chancellor in 2007.

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Augusta Bank Robbed

Updated 5 years ago

Police are asking for the public’s help in finding a man who held up an Augusta bank Tuesday afternoon.Police say the robber was wearing a ski mask when he entered Northeast Bank on Western Avenue around 4 o’clock Tuesday.The suspect was armed with a handgun. We’re told customers were inside at the time, but no one was hurt.He got away on foot with an undisclosed amount of money. Police trailed him to a parking lot where they think he drove off.Witnesses say the suspect is around six feet tall and weighs between 170 and 200 pounds. He was wearing gloves, a light grey sweatshirt and sweatpants.Augusta police are asking anyone with information to call them at 626-2370

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