Features

Cookin’ With Cathy: Phyllo with Pumpkin Custard

Updated 1 year ago

Recipe Courtesy: Cathy SperonisTo watch the video, click HERECrust1 – 8 oz. package frozen phyllo, thawed overnight in refrigerator1 cup unsalted butter, melted & clarified1) Remove defrosted sheets of phyllo from packaging, lay flat and cover with plastic wrap. Make sure to keep unused sheets of phyllo covered with plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out. 2) Brush the bottom of a 10″ pie pan with melted butter. Place 1 sheet of the phyllo pastry on a cutting board and brush liberally with the melted butter. Place another phyllo sheet on top and butter repeating process until you have four stacked and buttered layers of phyllo. Cut the stack in half and place the halves into the pie tin overlapping and tucking the edges under. 3) Repeat this entire process using a total of 16 sheets of phyllo. Reserve the remaining four sheets for confetti garnish (recipe to follow.)4) Place the crust in freezer and prepare the filling.Filling1- 15 oz. can solid-pack pumpkin3 eggs1/2 cup granulated sugar1/4 cup light brown sugar1/4 cup dark brown sugar1/2 tsp. salt1 tsp. ground cinnamon1/2 tsp. ground ginger1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg1/8 tsp. ground cloves3/4 cup milk1/4 cup heavy cream1) Preheat oven to 400°F.2) In large bowl whisk eggs and pumpkin puree until smooth.3) In a separate bowl combine sugars, salt and spices. Add to pumpkin mixture to combine. Add milk and heavy cream and stir just until combined.4) Pour into crust, cover with pie shield and bake in center of oven for 45 – 50 minutes until edges of crust are golden brown and center of pie is set. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely before serving.Phyllo-Nut Confetti1 Tbsp. granulated sugar1/4 cup walnuts1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon1/8 tsp. ground cloves1) Preheat oven to 400°F.2) Process the sugar, walnuts, cinnamon and cloves in the bowl of a food processor until finely ground and set aside.3) Place 1 sheet of the phyllo pastry on a cutting board and brush liberally with the melted butter. Place another phyllo sheet on top and butter repeating process until you have four stacked and buttered layers of phyllo.4) Sprinkle stack with nut mixture and cut stack into 1/2″ squares.5) Place squares onto parchment lined baking sheet and cook for 8 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool.

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Cookin’ With Cathy: Crispy Greek Baked Chicken

Updated 1 year ago

Recipe Courtesy: Cathy SperonisTo watch the video, click HERE1 large package bone-in skin-on assorted chicken pieces1 tsp. baking powder1 stick unsalted butter, softened1 Tbsp. olive oil1 clove garlic, pressed1 tsp. Greek Seasoning1/2 tsp. kosher saltOlive oil and kosher salt to season1) Preheat oven to 450°F.2) Clean and dry chicken thoroughly.3) Sprinkle chicken evenly with baking powder and rub onto skin of chicken pieces.4) Combine remaining ingredients to make seasoned butter.5) Place seasoned butter under skins of chicken.6) Season outside of skins with olive oil and kosher salt.7) Place chicken on a rack set inside of a sheet pan or roasting pan.8) Roast for 35 to 40 minutes until skin is crisp and chicken is done.

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Cookin’ With Cathy: Beer Bread

Updated 1 year ago

Recipe Courtesy: Cathy SperonisTo watch the video, click HERE2 cups All-purpose flour1 cup cake flour1 Tbsp. baking powder1/4 cup & 2 Tbsp. sugar1 tsp. salt1 bottle (12 oz.) beer2 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted1) Preheat oven to 375°.2) Grease and flour a 9″x5″x3″ loaf pan.3) Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl with a whisk until incorporated.4) Add the beer and stir to combine with the dry ingredients. Do not over mix. Mixture will be very thick.5) Pour into the prepared loaf pan and drizzle the melted butter over the top.6) Bake in the center of the oven for 35 to 40 minutes, until a cake tester comes out clean.7) Cool in pan for 10 minutes and then invert onto a cooling rack. Cool completely.

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Should all Maine voters be required to have a driver’s license?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 20% (64 votes) No 80% (261 votes)


Should people receiving state aid be made to work on projects for the state?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 89% (300 votes) No 11% (38 votes)


The Story of Your Money: Income and Expenses

Updated 1 year ago

Income and expenses, inflows and outflows, it’s the basics of money talk. If you were a business figuring out on paper your income and expenses has an official name. it’s an Income Statement. Sometimes this may be also be called a profit and loss statement.Profit and Loss Statement- In its simplest form you total all revenues, or money you’ve earned and subtract expenses from the earnings. Money really boils down to this very simple income minus expense equation. If want to change the bottom line, or what remains by increasing it, you have two options:Increase earnings – besides working more hours, or getting a job that may pay better, your could sell things you no longer need. Do you have a hobby that you love like carpentry, baking, decorating? One or two jobs every few weeks could add to your household bottom line.Cut expenses -First figure out what you spend your money on and think of better options. Though rent and utilities are typical cost drivers, consider even perceived smaller costs such as snacks, coffee and those pesky other habits like drinks with pals or smoking. If you can socialize less expensively you could cut a few dollars that could add up on your bottom line.Citations:http://www.wikihow.com/Reduce-ExpensesMarion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Vote Norumbega Financial for Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm at Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. and Norumbega Financial are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Are you registered to vote?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 91% (286 votes) No 9% (27 votes)


Has your property ever been vandalized?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 48% (178 votes) No 52% (195 votes)


Should the Red Sox fire Terry Francona or Theo Epstein?

Updated 3 years ago

Terry Francona 8% (20 votes) Theo Epstein 10% (24 votes) Neither 48% (122 votes) Both 34% (86 votes)


Should the speed limit on I-95 be 75 mph throughout Maine?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 54% (188 votes) No 46% (162 votes)


Break the Tie: Which kind of cupcake would you like to see made Thursday Morning?

Updated 3 years ago

Coconut Raspberry 38% (122 votes) Key Lime Cheesecake 24% (76 votes) Lemon Blueberry 15% (46 votes) Root Beer Float 23% (74 votes)


Healthy Living: Whooping Cough

Updated 3 years ago

Uncontrollable, violent coughing is one of the key symptoms of whooping cough. It’s highly contagious, also highly preventable. TV5 Health Advisor Dr. Jonathan Wood joined Jim Morris on TV5 News at 5 to help out.

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Tips for a Financial Crisis

Updated 1 year ago

Finance may be fun, but sometimes life can be unexpected or just really hard. If you face a major illness your family could face some serious financial problems. Here are a few ideas that may help in this crisis.Plan- some financial institutions refer to it as Plan B. Plan A is that life will be great and no one will become injured or hurt. But what if things don’t go according to the plan? Thinking about what to do is something. But actually planning is better still. Have the conversation!Insurance- Major medical insurance coves part of the medical expenses of any hospital care you might need. Worker’s comp is income replacement insurance if you are injured while on the job. Disability insurance may be offered at your workplace and it would provide income replacement if you are hurt outside of work, in the course of working around the yard, playing in summer or winter, working on the car.Face the reality- Whatever problem has occurred, face it head-on and begin piece by piece to get control of your life and then your finances. Set priorities – LIFE is the most important gift, the bills need to be paid but get life under control. Make a budget for the additional expenses. Let folks know what you need. It will be okay. You will get through this. Many other people in this community have lived through tough setbacks and have got back up. You have people who love you, folks who are cheering you on and you are strong! Citations:Plan Bhttp://moneyning.com/money-stories/how-to-recover-financially-from-a-life-upheaval/Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Vote Norumbega Financial for Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm at Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. and Norumbega Financial are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Do you subscribe to your local newspaper?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 24% (77 votes) No 76% (245 votes)


Should the Penobscot Indian Nation be subject to searches by Maine State Police?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 75% (347 votes) No 25% (113 votes)


Do you monitor your children’s online activities?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 64% (108 votes) No 36% (62 votes)


Would you use a commuter rail line from Bangor to Boston?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 78% (259 votes) No 22% (75 votes)


Are you in favor of expanding gambling in Maine?

Updated 3 years ago

Yes 55% (160 votes) No 45% (129 votes)


Healthy Living: Vaccines and Side Effects

Updated 3 years ago

By- Dr. Amy MoviusThere has been a lot of attention in the press lately regarding a certain vaccine. Unfortunately, what should be a cut and dried health issue can be politicized and otherwise distorted: bluntly stated, politicians and newscasters are probably not the best dispensers of medical advice (sorry WABI!).In approaching the subject of vaccinations, I opted to start with what I believe to be 2 undisputed truths:1. We all want what is best for the children in our lives.2. Doctors and other health providers come from a variety of political, religious and cultural backgrounds.Starting from these two assumptions, there is really very little controversy among medical professionals about the benefit and safety of vaccines. A quick look back in time illustrates the benefits. For example, before vaccine availability in the United States in the 1940s, there was an average of 175,000 cases/year of pertussis (whooping cough) or 150 cases/100,000 population. In the 1980s, there was an average of 2,900 cases per year or 1 case/100,000. In 2008 this was up to 13,278 cases. This is in part due to decreased vaccination rates. Unfortunately, in this example, the youngest among us suffer the most from severe illness and even death. Of the 181 pertussis deaths from 2000-2008, 166 were in children less than 6 months of age. All infants of this age are vulnerable to pertussis as vaccine immunity is not fully established until after 6 months of age (vaccine given at 2, 4, and 6 months). These most fragile among us must rely on not being exposed to avoid disease, which in turn depends on the immunity and vaccination status of the population at large. This does not mean that side effects from vaccines don’t exist. They do, and fortunately most of them are mild (pain/swelling at site). Also, some health problems coincidentally overlap with receiving a vaccination – they are unrelated except in time. However, in the US it is not expected that we vaccinate our children on faith alone. There is an organization that REQUIRES reporting of all possible adverse vaccine effects by health professionals and vaccine manufacturers. However, ANYONE can choose to make a report, including a patient (or a parent). Also, the results are public, so EVERYONE can access this information. The sole function of this organization, VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System), is to constantly process and analyze this data for the purpose of public safety. Because of this process, in 1999 the rotavirus vaccine was removed and then replaced. VAERS receives about 30,000 reports every year: 85% involve mild symptoms, 15% of the reports are more serious. Both of these numbers reflect possible vaccine related events, NOT definite vaccine caused events.Vaccinating yourself and your family is not a small matter. It can be very confusing with all the information – and misinformation –available. Consider discussing it with a health provider you know and trust. The goals you share should be simple: to keep you and your family happy and healthy.Referencesvaers.hhs.govwww.cdc.gov/features/pertussisdiseases.emedtv.com/whooping-cough/whooping-cough-statistics

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What do you use the Post Office for the most?

Updated 3 years ago

Bills 59% (164 votes) Letters 14% (36 votes) Cards 11% (31 votes) Presents 8% (23 votes) Bulk shipping 8% (23 votes)


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