Features

Ahead of Your Time: Financial & Legal Planning Issues to Consider

Updated 1 year ago

Life is not all lollipops and sunshine. You already pragmatically address some of the daily down-side issues of life with the purchase of Band-Aids and toilet paper. But what do you need to plan for your ultimate earthly future?In the book Ahead of Your Time authors and local business owners, Dick and Sue Coffin, provide stories, insights and specific planning strategies to take control, of your final arrangements. Though this is an vitally important topic it is often ignored. Planning is the best gift you can give to your grieving loved ones. This week and next we will cover some of the tips offered in this essential book. (Available from Rogan’s Memorials and at www.aheadofyourtime.net Why do this, go through the trouble of having these decisions made? Anyone who has had a loss, be it sudden or after a long illness know that the trauma is enough to deal with. This is no time for arranging a large event, and that what a funereal can be. Control your future, show your love, whichever way you interpret this, pre-planning for you passing and the subsequent arrangements is really an act of love! (And it can save money.) Financial – If you were gone today, would your family know what bills to pay? Would they have money to pay those bills? Years from now would they still be okay or would your estate be eaten up in taxes? There are many aspects to getting your financial house in order for your heirs not least of which are the day to day concerns as well as leaving money for special needs family members or your charitable interests. Have annual family business meetings to help loved ones ‘be on the same page’ concerning the bills and papers required to run the household. List bank accounts, investment holdings and the location of important papers on a pad of list and share that information with your trusted loved ones. make copies for you attorney or executor. Check on your life insurance that your family will be provided for including college for kids or grandkids if that is your intention. Make sure that beneficiaries named on insurance for or annuities and investment accounts are current! These accounts bypass any will or other document and will go to your mother, even if you are married but forgot to change your beneficiary’s name! Legal- Is a will or trust the best vehicle for transitioning your goods to your family? Do you have the legal documents to appoint someone to speak for you in your final days if you cannot speak for yourself? Do you want your grieving spouse to be responsible for everything during the loss? May not. But you need to plan to lift these burdens from your loved ones in a time of loss and pain. For more information see the book Ahead of Your Time, by Sue and Dick Coffin available at www.Aheadofyourtime.net Citations: Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated. Norumbega Financial and all other individuals and companies referenced are separate entities, independently owned and operated

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Hunter’s Safety

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Joan Marie PellegriniIt is that time of year again when we need to talk about hunter safety. Admittedly, accidents from hunting are way down compared with a few decades ago. However, the recent events in the news serves to remind us that this enjoyable activity has some dangers that can mostly be avoided.The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has a webpage (www.state.me.us/ifw/) that is an excellent source of information on the current laws governing hunting. Below, I have included the ten rules for safety. One of the most important points to make is that many feel the law in 1973 mandating hunter orange clothing and the first hunter safety courses in 1986 (Portland Press Herald Dec 4, 2008) are responsible for the dramatic decrease in hunting accidents. A hunter safety course is not just for the young and new-to-hunting. Although it is not mandated by law, everyone can benefit from a refresher once in awhile. It is easy to become complacent after many years of hunting and being around guns. Hunter safety courses are not just about how to use a gun. There is also good information on the laws, navigation, survival, etc. To find out more about these courses go to the IFW webpage.Source: Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife10 COMMANDMENTS OF HUNTER SAFETYGive every gun the respect due a loaded gun.Watch that muzzle and control its direction, even if you happen to fall.Be sure your target is the game your hunting, and identify beyond it before you pull the trigger.Be sure the barrel and action are clear of obstructions and that the ammunition is the proper size.Unload guns when not in use. Carry guns in cases to the shooting area.Never point a gun at anything you do not want to shoot, and never play.Never climb a fence or a tree or jump a ditch with a loaded gun. Never shoot a bullet at a flat, hard surface or water. And use an adequate shooting range backstop.Store guns and ammunition separately, beyond the reach of children.Avoid alcoholic beverages and other mood-altering drugs before and during shooting.

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L’Aperitif’s German sausage with Beer Mustard, Red Cabbage and Spatzel.

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

German Sausage2 bottles Samuel Adams Octoberfest beer2 cups chicken stock 4 garlic cloves 5 bratwurst1 cup whole grain mustardDirections:Mix beer, chicken stock, and garlic in pot. Bring to a light simmer. Add the bratwurst into the poaching liquid and cook until 145 degrees. For the mustard sauce, take the 1 cups of mustard and splash about 2 oz of beer and mix.Red Cabbage 2 heads red cabbage shredded 2 Cortland apples , diced 2 cups sugar 2 cups water 1 1/4 cups apple cider vinegara stick of butterDirections:Put butter in pan and sautÈ onions until translucent. Add the reaming ingredients to the pot and simmer for about 1 hour. German Spaztel1 lb flour7 eggs 8 ounces milk1 teaspoon nutmeg 2 ounces butter Directions:Bring a pot of water to a boil. Mix flour and nutmeg together. Mix the egg and milk together. Pour the wet into the dry. Will become a batter. If you have a spatzel cutter or anything with holes like a perforated spoon, push the batter through and into the water. Spatzel is done when it floats.

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Take this Job and Love it!

Updated 5 years ago

Reporter Adrienne Bennett was sporting an apron and cap as she tried out a new job for the day. She goes to school to learn the intricacies of cafeteria work in tonight’s “Take this Job and Love it!””Alright, perfect.” Donning an apron and hat, whaalaa, I’m ready to become a lunch lady.” It’s 10:30 and students at Mount View are hungry.Enna Moody is one of nine who work in the cafeteria feeding more than one thousand mouths each day. My first task — the sandwich station. “We call this sub Mount View.” “How many students come through here in a day?” “In the sandwich line? About 125 sandwiches per day.” Enna gives me a few tips on how to make the wrap.”Doesn’t make it right, just makes it my way.” And it’s harder than it looks when you’ve got to move fast.Next up – Hot foods.Today’s menu – Pasta salad, Popcorn chicken, asparagus with cheese and sweet potato fries. “Make sure you hit the plate. Haha” “This changes everyday, she makes something different everyday.” “This isn’t like the cafeteria I had when I was in school.” “no when you were in school every just got one dish.” Yeah, they’ve got some choices now.””That is asparagus with cheese on it. No asparagus with cheese this time.”Many of these junior high kids passed up the asparagus and went straight to the pizza, so my next stop was to slice it…Clearly, I’m not the one that does the cooking in my family…Gloria goes through 30 to 60 pizzas a day…(the walk out w/pizza shot)”Show me how you cut this bad boy.” “See that’s how it’s done.”So with all these plates going out…there’s one thing left to do…”The dishes.” “First of all you need gloves. Take dishes from that window and take them to the other side.” Faith has a system.”You have to be quick!” “I’m going, I’m going!”Occasional gum on the plate,”Stickers…”and stickers will slow you down…After rinsing, it’s off to stacking, but you’ve got to have a good eye.”Oh, we got a little spot.” Again, Faith, much faster than me.”I’m not that quick” “You get used to it.””Overall, with everything I did how’d I do? You did perfect, everything was really good.” “yay! Would you hire me?” Yes, Would you hire me?” Well how about you come do my job for a day?” Hahahah no!” But don’t let these ladies fool you, this is a demanding line of work – making me think I’ll stick to reporting for the kids sake. Adrienne Bennett, WABI TV5 News, Thorndike.If you have an idea for our next “Take this Job and Love it” report email us at wabi@wabi.tv

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Using Halloween to Reinforce Year-Round Health and Safety Habits

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Jonathan WoodThis year, consider using Halloween as an opportunity to discuss a number of global health and safety issues with your children. Yes, several pointed issues certainly all apply to the day itself. But this is also an opportunity to reinforce with your kids that the lessons of Halloween are worth applying to their lives every day of the year.Dental HealthCavities develop as a result of carbohydrates and the associated acids produced bathing the teeth. The total time and frequency of exposure is the key, not necessarily the amount of sugar. The acids remain in the mouth for approx 20 min after a snack or meal. This knowledge supports a number of healthy habits, Halloween-related or not:Candies or foods that bath the mouth for long periods (lollipops, dense sticky candies, etc) engender the greatest riskEating at proscribed meal and snack times, rather than “grazing”, will result in a healthier dental environmentTiming your Halloween candy consumption to around meals will reduce the associated risk of cavitiesSuggesting that kids eat little bits at a time and spread their candy consumption out over time will paradoxically increase their cavity riskEvening and Nighttime SafetyAs your kids prepare to wander the neighborhoods this year, use the holiday to remind them about pedestrian safety. It is especially important to stress that the driver visibility is at its worst during dusk, the time when many trick-or-treaters are out and about.Help your children choose costumes that offer adequate vision and mobilityConsider reflective costumes or at least adding some stick-on reflector materialFlashlights! One hand for the candy bag, one hand for the flashlight…!Review basic road crossing safety and stress the fact that these principles apply year ‘roundUse sidewalks whenever possible.Food AllergiesFor kids with food allergies, Halloween is a good time to review some of the principles of awareness and avoidance. Teach label reading to confirm that ingredients are acceptableUse the time to review the signs and symptoms of allergic reactions due to inadvertent exposureBe aware that “trick-or-treat” size candies occasionally do not contain the exact same ingredients as the full size version General Healthy Behaviors and Global Safety Issues With wood stoves fired up and with Jack-o-lanterns on porches, Halloween offers a context for reviewing fire safety. Also, consider fire safety when choosing costumes.Carving pumpkins offers a setting in which to review knife safety with small children and adolescents alike.Use Halloween to gently review stranger safety. Use the trick-or-treating experience to reinforce simple things like not getting in cars with strangers and not going into strangers’ homes unaccompanied. Halloween can be used to emphasize that most people are good people with good intentions, but that this doesn’t negate the value of prudence and being careful.Use Halloween to talk about peer pressure and mob mentality. For example, reinforce the difference between “tricks” and vandalism. Especially with older kids and adolescents, Halloween can offer an environment for trouble making. Prepare your kids with the means to identify and avoid inappropriate situations. Offering “scripts” for extracting themselves can be very helpful. Most important, discuss simple common sense with your kids. Nothing will serve them better than that! So, arm those kids with essential Halloween equipment (safe costume, good shoes, candy receptacle, flashlight, cell phone) and some common sense. They’ll have fun, learn some things along the way, and have plenty of year ‘round good habits reinforced!

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Ahead of Your Time

Updated 1 year ago

Life is not all lollipops and sunshine. You already pragmatically address some of the daily down-side issues of life with the purchase of Band-Aids and toilet paper. But what do you need to plan for your ultimate earthly future? In the book Ahead of Your Time authors and local business owners, Dick and Sue Coffin, provide stories, insights and specific planning strategies to take control, of your final arrangements. Though this is an vitally important topic it is often ignored. Planning is the best gift you can give to your grieving loved ones. This week and next we will cover some of the tips offered in this essential book. (Available from Rogan’s Memorials and at www.aheadofyourtime.net Why do this, go through the trouble of having these decisions made? Anyone who has had a loss, be it sudden or after a long illness know that the trauma is enough to deal with. This is no time for arranging a large event, and that what a funereal can be. Control your future, show your love, whichever way you interpret this, pre-planning for you passing and the subsequent arrangements is really an act of love! (And it can save money.) Arrangements- I know you have opinions, and have ‘tsk tsk’-ed at the arrangements of others. Well, now’s your turn to plan your arrangements. Do you want to be cremated, have your ashes spread, or buried? Do you want a memorial service or a Mass, or both? Do you want a loud party or a solemn time for loved ones? Plan your service. You can make your arrangements as specific as you’d like with music chosen and the coffin. Compare funeral homes and find one that you like that has a great reputation in the community. Communicate your plans with close family members or friends and then rest easy. Markers- Anyone who has chosen furniture, built a house of done outdoor work knows that nature dwarfs our structures. If you want a stone or marker for a grave site, Sue and Dick suggest walking respectfully through cemeteries with a tape measure and measuring the size of stones or markers that you like. When you are in a little shop the markers appear much larger than they look out in a large cemetery. These are the kinds of things to consider when preplanning. What kind of stone do you like? Do you want an engraving, which is done in great detail by large computers, to reflect you love of sports or family? Make that image part of your plan. Your site- You may know in what cemetery you want to be buried but have you checked if there are any available plots for sale? Do you want to secure enough area for the kids, spouses and grandkids? Are you hoping to be buried in a cemetery that supports you religious beliefs? How many markers or stones are allowed per lot? These and other questions are listed in Ahead of Your Time and these are the answers you need to plan. Citations: and the book. Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure (same for both weeks but longer than normal disclosure):Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated. Norumbega Financial and all other individuals and companies referenced are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Muddy Rudder’s Grilled Turkey Breast in Adobo Sauce

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

Ingredients:4- 6oz Turkey breast cutlets1 can Adobo sauce (pureed)4- 4oz portions of Mashed potatoes4- 6oz Portions of vegetableDirections:Marinate Turkey Breast at least 3oz with adobo sauce.Grill on med-high heat until it reaches an internal temp of at least 165°.Slice and serve with mashed potato and vegetable.

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National Depression Screening Day

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. David PrescottDepression – Progress But Still Undertreated: Great improvements have been made over the past two decades in terms of identifying and treating clinical depression. As with most health problems, early detection and treatment of depression offers the best chance for addressing the problem successfully. Estimates are that just over 16% of Americans will experience clinical depression in their lifetime. Sadly, many of those people never receive treatment. National Depression Screening Day: Each year since 1991, National Depression Screening Day has helped people learn more about depression and provided screening and treatment referrals for any interested person. Screening is now available on-line to make it even more widely available. Types of Depression: As you consider whether or not you ought to take the screening, it may help to review the primary types of depression that have been identified by mental health experts. These descriptions are also available at the national Mental Health Screening website ( www.mentalhealthscreening.org).Clinical depression or major depression is a serious and common disorder of mood that is pervasive, intense and attacks the mind and body at the same time. Current theories indicate that clinical depression may be associated with an imbalance of chemicals in the brain that carry communications between nerve cells that control mood and other bodily systems. Other factors may also come into play, such as negative life experiences including stress or loss, medication, other medical illnesses, and certain personality traits and genetic factors. Dysthymia is a milder form of depression that lasts two years or more. It is the second most common type of depression but because people with dysthymia may only have two or three symptoms, may be overlooked and go undiagnosed and untreated. Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of depression that follows seasonal rhythms, with symptoms occurring in the winter months and diminishing in spring and summer. Current research indicates that the absence of sunlight triggers a biochemical reaction that may cause symptoms such as loss of energy, decreased activity, sadness, excessive eating and sleeping. Bipolar DisorderBipolar disorder, also known as manic-depression, is a type of mental illness that involves a disorder of affect or mood. The person’s mood usually swings between overly “high” or irritable to sad and hopeless, and then back again, with periods of normal mood in between.Need more Information?Acadia Hospital: www.acadiahospital.orgNational Depression Screening Day: www.mentalhealthscreening.org).Depression Screening Questions – National Depression Screening DaySample Questions: Over the past two weeks, how often have you: Been feeling low in energy, slowed down?a. For none or little of the time. b. For some of the timec. For most of the timed. For all of the timeHad difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep? e. For none or little of the timef. For some of the timeg. For most of the timeh. For all of the timeIf you would like to complete a screening for depression and possible treatment recommendations, follow the link to National Depression Screening Day at:www.acadiahospital.orgAvailable on October 8, 2009

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Five Stages of Retirement

Updated 1 year ago

Getting ready for retirement and our years in retirement, which thanks to longer lifespans, now account for a lot of years and work best with important planning. Here’s a look at of the typical journey. Fantasy- The 15 years before retirement people begin to fantasize about what they’ll do – on not do – in retirement. This group have high expectations but according to studies, less than half in this age group believe they are saving enough. Excitement- 5 years before retirement there is a growing excitement. In surveys, people have what I would consider, unrealistic expectations about how great retirement will be. As one researcher put it, “Boy, when I get out of work, I’m going to be soooo happy!” The Big Day – The next 2 – 15 years is a readjustment of your previous expectations. Optimism drops from 80% to less than 65%. 25% of retirees are totally confused about their role in life. Peace- comes about 15 years into retirement. It could come way earlier than that for others. (Your emotional readiness and preparation plays an important role in your contentment.) Later Years- Three times as many retirees worry about paying for health care as worry about dying. Plan with that concern in mind. Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Fairmont Algonquin’s Seafood Chowder

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

The secret ingredient for this treasured 75 year old recipe is finally being revealed: Real Cream. Loaded with seafood, this sought after dish is surprisingly easy to make, and is guaranteed to impress. Ingredients:2 tablespoons butter 30 mL 2 tablespoons olive oil 30 mL 4 oz double smoked bacon, diced 125 g 1 cup diced celery 250 mL cup diced white onion 125 mL 1 tablespoon minced garlic 15 mL 2 pounds mixed seafood (diced salmon, halibut, 1 kg scallops, or lobster meat, small shrimp, baby clams) 3 Yukon gold potatoes, diced with skins on 3 (1 lb/500 g) 1 cup white wine 250 mL juice of 1 lemon 8 cups 35 % whipping Cream 2 L 6 tbsp chopped chives 90 mL Pinch chili flakes Pinch Salt and pepper 1. In a large pot, heat butter and oil over medium-high heat: stir in bacon, celery, onion and garlic: cook stirring, for 3 to 5 minutes or until onions are soft. Add seafood and potatoes: cook stirring for 2 minutes. Stir in wine and lemon juice: bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes or until reduced by three quarters. 2. Add cream: bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally for about 30 minutes or until potatoes are soft and soup has thickened slightly. Stir in chives, chili flakes and season with salt and pepper. Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: about 1 hr. 15 minutes Yield: Serves 12

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Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Amy MoviusEastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) is a very rare, but serious, viral disease that has killed several horses in Maine this fall.  “Triple E”, as it is sometimes called, can be very dangerous and even deadly in humans as well. The Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) was first seen in Maine in 2005 when it was found in some mosquitoes, birds, and horses.  Then, in the fall of 2008, a man in Cumberland County died of this disease.This fall, the EEEV has killed horses in 5 different counties of Maine.  This is significant as horses are infected the same way humans are – from being bitten by an infected mosquito.  The “reservoir” for EEEV is actually in songbirds.  Mosquitoes, especially those found around hardwood wetlands and costal areas, can pick up the virus from birds and then infect humans (and horses).  It is seen most often in late summer and early fall.  Humans and horses infected with EEEV are not themselves infectious to anyone else.  The increase of this disease in horses means that the virus is, unfortunately, alive and well in Maine in 2009. Most people who become infected with EEEV will have a mild flu or no obvious illness at all.  For some individuals, however, encephalitis develops.  Encephalitis occurs when there is inflammation around the brain.  Symptoms can include fever, headache, behavior changes and progress to coma and death.  Residents of wetland areas endemic for EEEV are at risk for contracting the infection, and persons over 50 and less than 15 years of age are more prone to developing serious disease.  Sadly, 1/3 of people who develop encephalitis will die and of those who survive, many have permanent brain damage.  Currently, there is no effective treatment for EEE and no vaccine for humans.  The key to staying safe is prevention!            1.  Always use an insect repellent when outdoors.  DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and oil & lemon eucalyptus products are effective and should be applied to skin and clothes.  Clothing may also be treated with permethrin, which will stay effective through several wash cycles.            2.  Cover up outdoors with long sleeves/pants.  Use nets to cover infant carriers.            3.  *Limit or reschedule outdoor group evening activities, such as school athletic events.  Participants and spectators should use insect repellents.  All of these activities should end at least 1 hour before sunset if the temperature is greater than 50 degrees.  This is because mosquito bites are most frequent at dusk and dawn.            4.  Clean up standing water around your yard: repair any window screens that need it.Maine is full of wetlands and mosquitoes, and this virus is expected to be a problem next year as well.  We need to use and develop defensive strategies now to protect ourselves while we continue to enjoy our beautiful state.Reference:  Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention

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Teaching Teens about Credit

Updated 1 year ago

We spoke a couple of weeks ago about the changing credit card laws that will restrict issuance of cards for anyone under 21. So how can you help younger students learn good credit habits? here are a few suggestions from the Wall Street Journal. Test Drive a Debit Card- I’ve spoken with middle school kids explaining to them the difference between credit cards and debit cards because they appear the same to the unschooled or inexperienced. But we know that debit cards draw money from a bank checking account. If you can teach kids to manage a debit account, that could be a good first step in helping them get the hang of not using cash. Authorized user of one your card- the author of the WSJ article suggests that making the child an authorized user of ‘one or more of your cards’ – I can’t imagine why they’d need to be an authorized user of more than one card, but in this way the ‘payment history of the card will appear on the child’s credit file and help him or her build a good credit history-assuming, of course, that the parent handles the card responsibly,’ according to the article. Secured Credit card- secured cards put cash down. They are like a pre-paid phone and allow you to use only up to the amount deposited with the credit card. If you pay the bill you have whatever available credit remains and you are able to establish credit history. A few years of these ‘guardrail’s can really help kids get a more solid footing and help them with their credit futures. Citations:WSJ Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videoswww.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial, Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. and the Wall Street Journal are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Sweet Potato Burritos from the Dinner Store

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

Ingredients:2 cups mashed sweet potatoes¼ cup onion, minced¾ teaspoon garlic, minced1 cup kidney beans, slightly mashed1/3 cup water½ tablespoon chili powder½ teaspoon cumin1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper2 flour tortillas¼ cup cheddarDirections:In a mixing bowl, add potatoes and beans then mix. Add garlic, onion, water, chili powder, cumin, cayenne pepper, and cheese. Mix well. Lay each tortilla on a sheet of aluminum foil. Place half of the mixture in the center of each tortilla. Fold up sides and roll in foil. Bake wrapped in foil at 350° for 25-35 minutes.

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Concussions

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Joan PellegriniAlthough anyone at any age can get a concussion, this time of year is particularly important because of the start of the sports season in the schools. A concussion happens when there is a blow to the head that causes either a loss of consciousness, a brief lapse of memory, or a feeling of dizziness or being dazed. Most of us do not consider concussions to be serious and therefore we shrug it off and encourage the athlete to get back on the field quickly. Unfortunately, a concussion is a form of brain injury and this is why it is so important to avoid concussions. People who have a concussion are at an increased risk of having seizures over the next five years. Also, multiple concussions can lead to learning disabilities and some loss of cognition. There is even a theory that multiple concussions can increase your risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease.Post-concussive syndrome is poorly understood. It is also very difficult to predict. This is a complex disorder that may cause headache and dizziness for weeks or months. There may also be mood or personality changes, diminished concentration, fatigue, nausea, balance issues, and loss of appetite. It is easy to see why this syndrome could cause serious problems with school, work, or family life.The most important thing about concussions is to prevent them. Many high risk sports require helmets. However, there are several sports with high risk that do not require helmets such as soccer and field hockey. Once you or your child suffers a concussion, it then becomes extremely important to avoid another concussion. Certainly, the brain needs time to heal. However, medical professions are uncertain how long the injury may take to heal. Currently, the recommendation is to avoid risky behavior until all symptoms have completely resolved. This may mean keeping your child out of the sport for several weeks or more. If your child had a concussion and then returns to the sport after a time of healing, it is important for the coach to look for signs of incomplete healing such as slow response times, balance issues, etc.If you suspect that your or a family member may be suffering from post-concussive syndrome, your family physician can refer you to a specialist that deals with brain injury. This physician may even refer to very specialized physicians that deal specifically with the neuropsychiatric complications of brain injury.

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Blueberry Breakfast Bake from the Dinner Store

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

***Serves 2***Ingredients:4 oz. day-old bread cut into 1” cubes3 oz. cream cheese cut into small cubes4 oz. blueberries4 eggs, beaten½ cup milk¼ teaspoon vanilla extract2 tablespoons maple syrup¼ teaspoon cinnamon¼ cup white sugar½ tablespoon cornstarch¼ cup water¼ cup blueberries¼ tablespoon butterDirections:In a metal mixing bowl, combine beaten eggs, maple syrup, milk, vanilla, and cinnamon. In a baking dish, add bread, cream cheese and blueberries, Pour egg mixture over bread then cover and put into the refrigerator for about 2 hours to let the bread soak up the egg mixture.Bake covered at 350° for 30 minutes then uncover and bake for another 25-30 minutes or until lightly browned.

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Hospitalization: Improved Communication = Improved Care

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Jonathan WoodBeing admitted to the hospital is can be scary and traumatic… for the patient and for the patient’s family.Being critically ill, needing invasive procedures or having a hospitalized child all accentuate these feelings The medical lingo is difficult to understand, the issues discussed often carry great importance, and there are often unanswered questions. What’s more, caretakers often seem to be overworked or in a hurry. And then money is invariably an issue: missed work, inadequate insurance, childcare needs, day-to-day living away from home, etc. More stress.In the end, many people report a sense of “loss of control”. What can be done?Arrgghhhh!While I cannot offer a fix for the sometimes beleaguered state of modern medicine, I will suggest one central thing that can help with all the above: improved communication. And much of it is within your control.Some suggestions:Ask questionso Who are you? Insist that people introduce themselves and explain their role in your care. Where do they fit in the lists above?o Why are we doing this? Insist on understanding why tests are being done and what is going to happen with the information.o May I speak with my doctor? Ideally there is one doctor orchestrating all of your care. Ideally there is excellent communication between doctors and amongst all the participants in the care team. Insist on a team and a good leader.Learn the system (i.e. who are all these people?)Hospitals depend upon a complex system of personnel that is often very confusing and very difficult to understand. Examples:o Primary Care docs (e.g. Internist, Family Practitioner, Pediatrician)o Inpatient Specialists (e.g. Hospitalist, Intensivist)o Specialists (e.g. Surgeon, Psychiatrist, OB-Gyn)o Sub-Specialists (e.g. Cardiologist, Neurologist, Orthopedic surgeon)o Midlevel Providers (e.g. Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant)o Nurses (e.g. bedside nurse, charge nurse)o Ancillary Personnel (e.g. Respiratory Therapy, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Nutritionists, Social Workers, Care Managers)o Trainees (e.g. residents, nursing students, medical students)Tell your caretakers your worries – don’t be afraid to tell people what concerns you or what would make you more comfortable. Nothing is off limits!Leave your biases at homeo Believe in the system – Much of believing is understanding. Work to understand the system (see above) and increased confidence will follow. o Don’t worry about offending – Doctors are people – – you can talk to them like you talk to anyone. Sometimes people feel intimidated, but it is important to move beyond this. Be yourself. Remember: you are the consumer. Be polite and expect the same in return.o Gender – The days of female nurses and male doctors are long over. Do not make assumptions based on gender and treat all your caretakers with respect. Insist on the same in return.o Teaching Hospitals – Much of the best care in the US is delivered in teaching hospitals. No one is experimenting on you. On the contrary, these are often very concerned, very smart, and often less busy students or residents who can be very helpful in you quest for quality healthcare. Take advantage of the opportunity!o Culture Differences – Maine attracts caregivers from all cultures. These people are invariably well trained and very caring. Treat them with respect and expect the same in reverse. If accents are difficult to understand, be frank, polite, and patient.Know what is expected of you and your family when you are dischargedo Ask questionso Get to know your “care manager” or “discharge planner”o Be sure you understand your medications and doses (including changes from when your arrived)o Have instructions repeated as many times as it take to understando Know who you need to see after leaving and where and when.While these suggestions won’t make being hospitalized fun, they may take some of the unnecessary fear and anxiety out of the process. In the end, remember… communication is the key!

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Take This Job and Love It: Gifford’s Ice Cream

Updated 5 years ago

We’ve all wondered what it would be like to switch jobs and try something new.Amy Erickson’s been trying her hand at all sorts of professions.This time, she’s scooping Gifford’s famous ice cream.She has more in this “Take This Job and Love It.”Rhonda Charette’s a scooping superstar.She’s been here at Gifford’s Ice Cream in Bangor for 20 years.She says she can teach me the ropes…but it’ll be trickier than I think.”Is there more of a challenge in here than people think? definitely. takes a little bit of practice.””You can get ice cream up to your elbows, so be careful! Ok!”Once I’ve donned my apron, I start with the basics…scooping ice cream.First surprise?Each scoop has to be the exact same size…four ounces.We start with vanilla.”And you use this as a cutting edge. you scrape the ice cream towards you until you think you’ve got enough for your cone.”Sure enough, Rhonda’s scoop is right on the money.”How did you do that? Exactly 4 ounces. How’d you do it? 20 years’ work, probably.”Next, I try my hand…it’s not as easy as it looks.”Oh, I’m over. Not too bad!”From there, Rhonda shows me the secret of adding sprinkles…”Lay it on, roll it around, you’re pressing…there you go.”…And how to make a frappe that has just the right consistency…Then it’s time for more of a challenge…”Ok, you’re going to make a sundae with mint chip ice cream. It needs 2 scoops of mint chip.””Ok, that’s the tricky part….tuck in any fudge that’s falling out.””I like whipped cream. Now put a cherry on top…a teaspoon of nuts.”I think it looks good enough to eat.Next, it’s time to prepare the homemade waffle cones…I start with the batter.”How do you get it out of there? use your muscle! this job takes more muscle than i thought. Is your right arm much stronger than your left? It sure is!”Then it’s time to fire up the waffle maker and shape the cones…look how fast Rhonda does it…Now it’s my turn…”It’s a little hot! that’s why we move so fast.”And I forgot the most important part…sealing the bottom of the cone…uh-oh.”So whoever has a drippy cone tonight can blame me. we’re gonna tell them to give you a call!”When I’m done, Rhonda gives me my review.”You did great. I’d bring you back for a little more training but then you could work with us anytime during the summer.””As fast as we work here, the pace, you just need to practice a little more…and toughen up my hands for those hot waffles?! definitely.”We’re always looking for suggestions for our next job swap story.If you have a suggestion, email us: wabi@wabi.tv

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Reducing the Stigma of Mental Illness

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. David PrescottWhy Is Reducing the Stigma of Mental Illness Important? There are probably dozens of reasons that challenging the stigma of mental illness and addiction is important. But none seem more compelling than the fact that nearly two-thirds of people who experience a mental illness never receive any type of professional help for their problems. The negative attitudes, fears, and stereotypes that surround mental illness are one of the largest barriers to people receiving professional help. Stigma: A Mark of Social Disgrace? One definition of stigma is “a mark of social disgrace.” The concern is that our own personal fears and distrust lead us to think about people with mental illness in a way that makes the problem worse. Stigma leads to treating people with mental illness differently than we would treat them if they didn’t have a mental illness. Examples of the forms that stigma against mental illness can take include: Stereotyping People with Mental Illness – for example, assuming that people with severe mental illness can never have a job or a family of their own. Fearfulness – not talking to someone with mental illness or purposefully avoiding them. Discrimination – for example, not considering a person with known mental illness for a volunteer position, renting an apartment, or considering them for a job, based solely on the knowledge that they have, or have had, a mental illness. Language – talking about mental illness in a way that makes fun of people with mental illness or perpetuates stereotypes, makes it harder for stigma to be eliminated. Avoid the Temptation to Say “Mental Illness Doesn’t Affect Me: People usually are not very happy if someone suggests they are prejudiced or hold negative stereotypes. Or, many people may see the issues around mental illness and addiction as not really affecting them or their family. However, the fact is that one in five people worldwide will have a mental or neurological disorder at some time in their life. This statistic virtually guarantees that everyone will be impacted by mental illness, and our ability to provide help in promoting recovery. Steps Towards Reducing Stigma: Eliminating societal level stereotypes of mental illness is an enormous goal. But, like all big problems, there are important steps that start with individuals. Some things that you could do include: Become More Knowledgeable: When we don’t know the facts, it is easier to rely on a stereotype or false belief. Knowledge about mental illness is readily available on the web or in books. Knowing a few simple facts, like that the majority of people with mental illness recover from that illness, can help reduce stigma. Watch your Language: One good place to start is to use “people first” language – saying “people with mental illness” instead of “the mentally ill.” And, obviously, eliminating derogatory terms like “psycho” is important. Listen: If you know someone with mental illness, listen to their story and their experience. You don’t need to have professional knowledge about treatment to listen. Just offer the respect and dignity you would offer any friend. For More Information: Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration’s “What A Difference a Friend Makes” Campaign: www.whatadifference.samhsa.govAcadia Hospital Web Site: www.acadiahospital.orgNational Alliance for the Mentally Ill: www.nami.org

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Mozzarella Meatballs from the Dinner Store

Todd Simcox

Updated 1 year ago

Makes 8 meatballsIngredients:½ lb. ground beef¼ cup bread crumbs1/8 cup milk 1 egg¼ cup minced onion1 teaspoon chopped garlic¼ teaspoon black peppermozzarella cheese cut into 8, ½” cubesmarinara sauce or sauce of your choiceDirections:In a bowl, combine ground beef, bread crumbs, milk, egg, onion, and pepper. Mix well. Shape meat mixture into 1” to 1 ½” meatballs around a cube of mozzarella. Place in single layer in a foil pan or baking dish, cover with marinara. Bake at 400° for 25 minutes.

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Walk This Way; Child Pedestrian Safety

Updated 5 years ago

By- Dr. Amy Movius School is back in session and for households with children, this necessitates a shift of routine that includes getting kids to and from school as well as school related activities. The logistics of more coming/going from more places deserves some special attention, as each year approximately 900 children in the US are killed while walking and more than 50,000 are injured. Unlike adult, child pedestrians tend to be injured in broad daylight under optimal conditions – meaning no impairment of visibility or poor road conditions. Boys outnumber girls in injuries sustained. Looking back, the number of child pedestrian fatalities has decreased by almost 50% since 1997. Before congratulating ourselves, however, we must realize this is not due to an improvement in pedestrian safety. Rather it is merely a consequence of fewer kids walking at all. In 1969, 42% of all children walked or biked to school: increasing to 87% for those who lived within a mile of school. Today, a whopping 16% of children walk or bike to school and a large proportion of kids living less than a mile away are still driven to/from school. This behavior is consistent with the alarming increases in obesity and decreases in exercise seen in our country’s children. One of the goals of the Healthy People 2010 initiative is to increase the proportion of trips less than a mile that are made by walking. Weather permitting, school travel is a great opportunity to incorporate this healthy lifestyle, though obviously not at the expense of children’s safety. Safety is the second most common reason cited by parents who opt not to have their children walk to school. Evaluating the factors that contribute to child pedestrian injuries can be helpful in creating safer walking conditions for children. The first contributor to child pedestrian injuries is the child him/herself. Children have limited ability to scan traffic activity and are poor judges of vehicle distance, speed, and estimating time needed for street crossing. Children are also inherently quick moving and impulsive. That most child pedestrian accidents occur when children dart into the street, not at intersections is further proof of this. Adults tend to overestimate the ability of our children to navigate traffic, simply because we don’t appreciate the physical and perceptive limitations of their age. For this reason, the AAP states children less than 10 should not be unsupervised pedestrians. A second contributor to pedestrian accidents is, unsurprisingly, the driver. It is more difficult to see children because they are small. This is even worse in vehicles of elevated height such as SUVs, vans, and trucks. (Incidentally, the injuries caused by these vehicles tend to be worse than normal passenger cars). Also just as children are poor judges of traffic distance, drivers are poor judges of child pedestrian distance, again because of their smaller size. Speed is a huge contributor to accident occurrence and severity of injuries. Cars going fast take longer to slow and stop. Whereas there is an 85% chance of survival for a pedestrian struck by a vehicle going 20mph, there is an 85% chance of death for a pedestrian stuck by a vehicle going 40mph. A last consideration is the environment in which a child walks. In urban areas, high traffic and poor visibility due to parked cars are concerns. For more rural areas, few traffic lights, lack of sidewalks or any barrier between pedestrian and vehicle routes are major concerns. Encouraging children to walk more is a worthwhile effort and a few guidelines can make is much safer. First, supervision by an adult is the most effective tool to keeping child pedestrians safe. Remember, no child pedestrian under 10 yrs of age should be unsupervised. Second, adults should be good role models when walking. We can hardly expect our children to take crosswalks, sidewalks and crossing signals seriously if we do not. Plan the safest route to your child’s destination, perhaps enlisting community and government resources to establish and protect these paths. The pedestrian equivalent of a car pool can also be formed, where parents take turns walking a group of children to school. Several resources such as Safe Routes to School (which is federally funded), Kids Walk, and Walk to School Day can help get you started. Lastly, children who have been involved as pedestrians in accidents have a very high incidence (30%) of Acute Stress Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. This is true even for very minor accidents. Most are not brought to professional help. If your child has been in a “near miss” accident they may have symptoms such as reexperiencing the incident, avoidant behavior, hyper arousal, or dissociation (shut down). Please take your child to their medical provider if there is any concern. Reference:Policy Statement – Pedestrian Safety, American Academy of Pediatric 2009, www.aap.org www.healthypeople.gov www.saferoutesinfo.org www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/kidswalk/resources.htm www.walkingschoolbus.org

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