Healthy Living

Healthy Living: Summertime Allergies

Updated 2 months ago

Summertime Allergies
By: Amy Movius MD
Sneezing. Itchy, watery eyes. Runny nose. Dark under-eye circles. Anyone with allergies is familiar with these symptoms. Allergies often flare in springtime with all the spectacular blossoming and blooming -and pollen production – going on. Allergies don’t take a summer holiday however, and pollen remains the main culprit. The source of the pollen does change though: in spring it’s trees, in summer it’s the more mundane grasses and weeds. Ragweed, a top allergy offender, swings into full gear in August. You don’t have to see it to feel it either, since ragweed pollen can travel hundreds of miles on the wind. Pollen isn’t the only summer allergen. Summer air pollution – think ozone – can worsen allergy symptoms. Higher temperatures and less wind (=summer) increases ozone. Also, there are allergies to beware of an entirely different kind – the kind that stings and bites and seem to be everywhere in summer. Bees and wasps and other stinging/biting insects commonly cause pain and swelling locally. Some people will be terribly, dangerously allergic to them however, even if they’ve never been bit before. Anyone who gets a rash or swelling all over, even the first time after a bite, should be very concerned. These types of allergic reactions frequently get worse each time they occur and can be life threatening. Staying inside all summer wouldn’t be much fun – nor would it protect you from all allergies. Mold loves damp and humid places, a description that applies to probably every bathroom and basement in Maine during the summer J. Also, dust mites – a relentless year-round allergen – peaks in the warm and humid summer months. They don’t bite but rather eat dead skin cells (gross, I know) and so hang out where people do; in beds, pillows, upholstery, and carpet.
Management of summertime allergies includes avoiding and limiting exposure to allergens, removing allergens as much as possible, using over-the-counter medications, and seeking medical advice and sometimes specialized care and treatment when allergies are more extreme. For outdoor allergies, checking pollen counts is a good start. They tend to be higher on warmer, drier and windier days, and peak midday to afternoon. Exercising inside and keeping windows closed can be helpful on high pollen days. Likewise, a good rain can temporarily clear pollen away. If you know you will be exposed to an allergen, taking an over-the-counter antihistamine can prevent symptoms more easily before they start. If pollen sensitive, wearing a hat and sunglasses outdoors will keep some pollen out of the face and eyes. Wear gloves when doing activities such as gardening and avoid touching face. Washing hands when coming indoors and rinsing eyes with cool water is helpful as well. Showering and washing hair at night and changing clothes before getting into bed will also remove any leftover pollen clinging to you from the day. As for stinging insect exposure, avoid going barefoot in areas they inhabit. They are attracted to bright colors and sweet smells so avoid like clothing and scents in these areas as well. Also, don’t drink from open cans outside (they like to fly in for a sip) and keep food covered. Those with severe allergies should always carry an epi-pen with them as prescribed. For indoor mold, keep prone areas as clean and dry as possible, and use dehumidifiers if available. Dust mites are everywhere and just the right size to be inhaled. Vacuuming and just walking on carpet will send them floating into the air. An estimated 90% of people with allergic asthma are dust mite sensitive. Covering mattresses, pillows (polyester ones best), and box springs with airtight dust mite covers is an excellent idea since we spend about a third of our life sleeping. Weekly washing of all bedding in very hot water and drying on high heat is recommended to kill dust mites. For other indoor areas, floors should be damp cleaned or vacuumed with HEPA filter at least weekly. Laundering throw rugs, opting for blinds over drapes, and avoiding dust mite loving collectors such as stuffed animals can also help keep the population down.
References:
1. Summer Allergies. webmd.com
2. Top 5 Summer Allergens – ABC News. abcnews.go.com, May 29, 2012
3. Don’t Let Allergies, Asthma Spoil a Summer Soiree and Keep Your Green Thumb. accai.org
4. Dust (Dust Mite) Allergies: Symptoms, Causes, Treatments. webmd.com>

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Healthy Living: High Stress and Poor Health

Updated 2 months ago

High Stress and Poor Health:  Breaking the Negative Cycle

Healthy Living – July 8th, 2014

Dr. David Prescott – Acadia Hospital

 

The High Stress/Poor Health Negative Cycle:  New research from the Harvard School of Public Health, Robert Woods Johnson Foundation, and National Public Radio, point out the strong relationship between stress and chronic illness.  Public health experts and medical researchers have long known that life stress increases people’s risk for heart disease, obesity, and other health problems.  However, experts are now noting that coping with a chronic illness, either having the illness yourself, or caring for a family member with a chronic illness, brings on more stress.

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Healthy Living: A Look at Gluten-Free Diets

Updated 3 months ago

ARE GLUTEN-FREE DIETS HEALTHIER FOR YOU?

By: Dr. Joan Marie Pellegrini

People who have celiac disease (CD) cannot eat gluten without it causing damage to their intestines. For an unknown reason, their immune system in the intestinal tract turns on itself when it is exposed to gluten. This disease is rare and affects only 2-3 million Americans according to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. It used to be quite difficult to diagnose because there were no blood tests available. Now that it is easier to diagnose, more physicians and patients are becoming aware of its existence.
One of the problems with diagnosing CD is that the symptoms are similar to other diseases. Bloating, headaches, migraines, joint pains, fatigue, “brain fog”, diarrhea, and anemia can all be very nonspecific symptoms and caused by several other illnesses. People with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, other food allergies, bacterial overgrowth, other autoimmune illnesses, and inflammatory bowel syndrome can also have many of these symptoms.
CD is caused by an autoimmune response against gluten which is a group of proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is what gives bread its characteristic texture. In order to treat CD, a patient must maintain a gluten-free diet (GFD) for the rest of their life. Patients who are more likely to develop CD are those with a family history, those with other autoimmune diseases, and diabetics.
When someone has symptoms suggestive of CD, many doctors and patients may simply try a GFD to see if their symptoms improve. However, this is not adequate for making the diagnosis. In order to truly make the diagnosis, a patient must be on a diet containing gluten and then have blood work that confirms the presence of certain antibodies. Once this is done, many patients will then need an endoscopy and multiple small bowel biopsies in order to confirm the diagnosis.
Doctors have known about CD for many years even though it may have been difficult to diagnose. A more recently recognized condition is gluten sensitivity. This is not a true allergy. These patients have the same symptoms but do not have any autoimmune disease that causes damage to the intestinal lining. It is not completely known why they have bloating and diarrhea and why they feel better with less gluten in their diet. Even gluten sensitivity is not that common and is estimated to affect only 18 million Americans.
CD patients almost always have nutritional deficiencies because of chronic malabsorption. However, even with strict adherence to a GFD, they often have problems obtaining enough calories because of limited food options depending on where they live and what they can find in their local grocery store. The good news for patients with CD is that there are now many more options at the market for them. There are breads, pastas, cookies, etc. that are made with rice or oats or other grains that do not contain gluten. Because of this, GFD has become more popular. It has been touted as a “healthier” diet and as a “quick weight loss” diet. A brief Google search revealed many sites even by famous TV doctors recommending GFD as a healthy diet. However, the science does not support this. Processed GFD foods that are available at the market are higher in lipids, trans fats, sugar, salt, and cost. A medical journal called Gut Microbe published a study in 2010 that looked at healthy volunteers (they did not have CD) that were put on a GFD. These study subjects on a GFD had a decrease in the healthy bacteria in their intestines and had an increase in the unhealthy bacteria. They also developed decreased immune function. None of this is good for the person who does not have CD.
Recommendations: if you have symptoms of CD you should discuss this with your doctor and get tested for CD. If you cannot afford to see a doctor, there are direct to consumer tests for CD available on the market but they are not yet approved by the FDA. If you do not have CD you may still have gluten sensitivity. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome have gluten sensitivity. If you have been diagnosed with CD or gluten sensitivity, you should be referred to a nutritionist that is knowledgeable about GFD so that you do not develop any of the complications of being on a GFD long term. If you do not have CD, remember, there are other conditions which may cause similar symptoms and you will need to continue to work with your doctor to make a diagnosis. If you are just looking to lose weight, avoiding bread may be beneficial because of the extra calories and carbohydrates but you do not need a gluten free diet per se. In fact, there are many better and easier diet plans available to you for weight loss.

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Pants on Fire 5K Beer Run and Walk

Updated 3 months ago

 

Kimberly Merrifield, Race Director of the Pants on Fire 5K Beer Run and Walk, came into the studio on Friday to talk about the fundraising event this Saturday, June 28th.

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4th Annual ALS Calendar Raffle

Updated 3 months ago

 

Cathy Billings, Associate Director for Communications and Development at Lobster Institute, came into the studio on Wednesday to talk to Wayne about the fourth annual ALS Calendar Raffle to fund the Bangor Walk to Defeat ALS coming up August 23rd.

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Healthy Living: Memory Decline With Aging: Can It Be Prevented?

Updated 3 months ago

Memory Decline With Aging:  Can It Be Prevented?

Healthy Living – June 24, 2014

Dr. David Prescott – Eastern Maine Medical Center Behavioral Medicine

In about 15 years, twenty percent of the American population will be over 65 years old.  One of the most common concerns about aging is memory and whether memory difficulties are inevitable as we grow older.  In addition, seniors want to know what, if anything, they can do to prevent memory loss.

Read more on Healthy Living: Memory Decline With Aging: Can It Be Prevented?…


Fitness Friday: Heavy Sweating

Updated 3 months ago

Amy Badger of Bodies by Badger was in the studio for another Fitness Friday this week. She stopped in to speak to Wayne about sweating during your exercises, and how to effectively replenish yourself.

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Fitness Friday: Gliders

Updated 3 months ago

Amy Badger from Bodies by Badger was back in the studio on Friday for Fitness Friday. This week she was teaching Joy and Wayne some exercises you can do with gliders in your living room.

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Healthy Living: FDA Warning on Tanning Beds

Updated 3 months ago

FDA Warning on Tanning Beds

Amy Movius MD

Late last month the FDA issued a Black Box warning requirement on sun lamps products – which include tanning beds. The FDA is tasked with protecting public health in different ways, including by assessing the safety of medical devices. A Black Box warning is the strictest warning label available.
This warning states:
Tanning bed use is contraindicated in anyone less than 18yrs
Tanning beds must not be used by people with skin lesions or open wounds
Tanning beds should not be used by people with skin cancer or a history of skin cancer
People who are repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet radiation require regular evaluation for skin cancer

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Healthy Living: Prostatic Hypertrophy – Not Always Benign

Updated 3 months ago

Ah, the prostate…A curious gland that boys under 15 are not aware of, and men over 50 can be all too aware of. In a recent study looking at how frequently men over 50 report having prostate problems, researchers at the University of Maryland found that 42% have some abnormality of urinary function attributed to an enlarging or inflamed gland. And symptoms that include frequent or painful urination, waking up at night to urinate, loss of urinary force to the point of occasionally becoming unable to urinate will increase in as men age, eventually affecting 80% of men over 70. The last symptom is particularly vexing, often require catheter placement and surgical procedures to overcome.

Read more on Healthy Living: Prostatic Hypertrophy – Not Always Benign…


Fitness Friday: Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

Updated 4 months ago

 

Amy Badger of Bodies by Badger was in the studio for another Fitness Friday this week. She stopped in to speak to Wayne about dealing with the soreness you can experience after a good workout.

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Fitness Friday: Lunges

Updated 4 months ago

Amy Badger from Bodies by Badger was back in the studio on Friday for Fitness Friday. This week she was teaching Joy and Wayne the correct posture and movements for lunges.

Read more on Fitness Friday: Lunges…


Healthy Living: Summertime and Berries

Updated 4 months ago

Summertime and the berries are out: Is there a reason you should not eat them?

In general, health providers and nutritionists recommend eating many fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy diet.

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Healthy Living: The Mental Health Parity Law

Updated 4 months ago

The Mental Health Parity Law:
Making Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment more Affordable

Healthy Living – May 27, 2014
Dr. David Prescott – Eastern Maine Medical Center Behavioral Medicine

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Fitness Friday: Adventure Races

Updated 4 months ago

 

Amy Badger from Bodies by Badger was back in the studio for Fitness Friday. This week she talked to Wayne about the growing trend of adventure races around the country, and what you should be prepared to do when getting ready for one.

Read more on Fitness Friday: Adventure Races…


Fitness Friday: Shoulder Exercises

Updated 4 months ago

 

Amy Badger from Bodies by Badger was back in the studio on Friday for Fitness Friday. This week she was teaching Joy and Wayne some simple shoulder exercises using resistance tubes and low weight dumbbells.

Read more on Fitness Friday: Shoulder Exercises…


Healthy Living: Why Do We Always Ask for the Kids’ Menu?

Updated 4 months ago

Why do we always ask for the Kids’ Menu?

(AKA: Why do we “dumb down” our kids’ food choices?)

 

  • French fries
  • Mozzarella sticks
  • Hot dogs
  • Spaghetti with red sauce

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Food Safety Tips for the Summer

Updated 4 months ago

By: Dr. Joan Pellegrini

Food left out can grow bacteria and become a source of illness anytime of the year.  However, summertime is a particularly vulnerable time because there are more picnics and gatherings and the temperatures are warmer.  There are three problems with food borne illness: 1) improper food preparation, 2) susceptible foods, and 3) improper food storage.

Read more on Food Safety Tips for the Summer…


Fitness Fridays: ZUMBATHON

Updated 5 months ago

 

Amy Badger of Bodies by Badger was in for this week’s Fitness Friday talking to Joy about a ZUMBATHON fundraiser hapenning Friday night, and gives you an idea of what to expect at your first ZUMBA session.

Read more on Fitness Fridays: ZUMBATHON…


Fitness Friday: Resistance Tubes

Updated 5 months ago

 

Amy Badger from Bodies by Badger was in for another Fitness Friday, this time teaching Joy and Wayne some quick and easy exercises you can do with resistance tubes.

Read more on Fitness Friday: Resistance Tubes…


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