Business & Finance

Start the New Year on the Right Financial Foot

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion SyversenMonitor spending – Make every dollar work for you by knowing where each one goes! Know what percent of your income is used for food, entertainment, savings, and the rest.Make a budget – Now you can make a budget. Find a budget type- there are many- that works for you and get a plan for this year.Pay off debt- While you are at it, pay off, or at least pay down, debt. Under most circumstances, we have enough money to pay more on our debt. It is only under life’s most dire conditions that we can’t achieve at least some progress. Use cash and pay down debt this year!Check your credit report- Free credit reports are available from each of the three agencies so either get them all at once or, a better solution may be to get one from each agency at four-month intervals. Experian in January (at Experion.com), Equifax in May (at Equifax.com) and Transunion (at Transunion.com) in September. That way you can monitor your credit score and credit activity for free.Back up your information- Does your family have an emergency plan, do you have a disaster recovery plan for your financial records? Consider options that would help you recover your pertinent data if anything happened to your records.Check insurance and beneficiaries- Is you life and property and casualty insurance up to date? If there have been changes to your family is that information reflected in you insurance and is your beneficiary information correct and current? Put your mind at ease and get your financial house in order with these tips for your best 2010!Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial, Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., and all other companies listed are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Savings Gifts for Kids

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion SyversenLet’s say you think opening an account for your little pumpkin would be a great idea for Christmas. Let’s look at the rules for some of the most common types. Savings account- If you open a joint account with your little sweetie, that account is typically an UGMA account. UGMA stands for Uniform Gift to Minors and allows minors to own an asset because it is owned for them or with them. But when they are 18 years old it becomes their asset. You might think, “oh, this will be the money that I give junior for college,” but in fact Junior can use it for his first car as soon as he is 18 years old. And Princess might give the money to her misunderstood boyfriend, and she would be within her legal rights to do so if you open an UGMA account for your kids or grandkids, since it becomes their money at age 18.College savings account- If you open a 529 account for your little angel the UGMA rules will only apply if you are moving money from an UGMA account. If you are opening a new 529 account that account is held for the darling and is completely in the name of the account owner but can be used for your darling. The money can be used for post secondary schools such as golf or cooking schools, 2 year colleges, trade schools, anywhere that federal funds are accepted in the US and a few schools in Canada. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Keeping Costs Down at Christmas

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion SyversonGet organized- Please use a list and pare it to who really needs gifts. Money isn’t a substitute for love so don’t mistake the two.Give group gifts- Can you buy a group gift of a great game, puzzle or event, like a dinner? Can you offer babysitting or another gift that is time versus money? Think out-of-the-usual box for a unique expression of thoughtfulness.Know the recipient- How many gifts have you received that were not even close to what you might use? It’s better to save your money than to spend it without thought and care. Know the recipient or don’t give a gift at all.Could online be cheaper?- Online retailers are offering discounts and offering cheap or no-cost shipping for gift giving. You might save time gas and travel buy doing some shopping online.No impulse buying- I have had really good intentions and started my shopping really early only to be sidelined by impulse shopping as Christmas approaches. Only buy what you have decided to get and stop shopping. Bake, do kind deeds, but stop shopping!Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial, Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., and all other companies listed herein are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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A Man’s Not a Financial Plan*- REALLY!

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion SyversonI have discussed the differences between men and women before but a recent news story compels me to speak of this again. After all, a discussion in which I get to grab you by your adorable little ears and shake you always seems appropriate to me.Perhaps you read about Patricia Cornwell suing her financial advisors? Cornwell, author of the award winning, best selling crime novels, has published seventeen books featuring pathologist Dr. Kay Scarpetta and has earned millions of dollars.In late October, Cornwell sued her financial advisory firm for losses of $40 million. Many people have lost money with their investments in the two years. The bit about this story that I found shocking – yes, shocking, I say – was the lack of involvement Cornwell had in her hard-earned finances and its management.According to news reports, especially in those publications widely read by investment professionals, there are some glaring red flags in my mind as to where some of the responsibility lies. #1- Cornwell didn’t want to be, according to the suit, ‘distracted’ by that crazy money stuff. After all, she’s a famous writer and needs a calm and quiet environment in which to work. And, she stated in Britain’s’ Daily Express, ‘I don’t really want to know what’s going on in my business unless I’m made to face it.” Stomp you foot, Patricia, and make that pouty face. That’ll make the big, smart men help you with your millions. #2- She never had a risk tolerance conversation, or so she claims. For a clever woman, Cornwell seems to have used her shiny pile of money to press people into letting her not be a participant in her financial affairs. Maybe she said, ‘It hurts my head and I don’t like it.”I’ve got a message for Patricia Cornwell: Don’t try that in my office. I have turned away clients who thought they could dump the responsibility of their finances. I like shiny things, and a large pile of jingly money definitely counts. But there is no way that your bag of cash excuses you from getting a face-to-face sit down at least annually for a discussion on the financial progress we’re making towards your goals. Take that big ole bag of money to the many firms that’ll allow you to ignore your own checkbook and leave it their hands.In my book (Have I mentioned I’ve written a book? Just in case I haven’t, check out Real Deal: Making Big Changes with Small Change) I have a chapter that includes the story of Paula Zahn. Married to a man who apparently enjoyed financial management, when they divorced her lawsuit claimed that he had, ‘spun a Byzantine web of investments’ and she was left with little to show of her $25 million in earnings. What’s Marion’s lesson for today? Money’s hard to understand for you. I get that. We all have different abilities and talents. I stink at a bunch of things in which you probably excel. However (and I’m sure you know what’s coming, little chickadee), pull up your big person panties and pay attention when figuring out your finances. Please.  Let the lunacy of others be a guide to you so we don’t have to read about your sad story in tomorrow’s paper.Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Dealing with Financial Difficulty: Death

Updated 1 year ago

This is the last in our series on Dealing with Financial Difficulty. These topics have involved not just financial but also emotional trouble resulting in our first week’s topic divorce, then last week’s job loss and this week’s topic which is the death of a loved one.Arrangements- Hopefully you and your loved one have spoken about what was wanted for funeral and burial arrangements. These things require action first. Communicate with relatives and the funeral home for help at this time.Incoming bills- Overwhelmed by grief financial paperwork can quickly pile up. ASK FOR help from a trusted family friend or family member.Death certificates- The Massachusetts Commission on end -of life care recommends 10-15 copies of them for many reasons and to settle many accounts.Insurance- if you had life insurance for your loved one ‘valid claims’ are paid relatively quickly, usually within 1 week from receipt of a death certificate. You will need to know the policy number. Assets- Informing Social Security, pension funds, changing ownership for checking and savings accounts, brokerage and deeds, cars and credit cards are some of the details that will need to be taken care of after the death of your loved one. Get professional advice when you are in doubt. Take your time. This isn’t a race!Be prepared to spend a lot of time with the financial concerns following the death of a loved one.Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.comCheck out or website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.comVoted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of AmericaIn compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Dealing with the Difficulty of Job Loss

Updated 1 year ago

We are in the middle of a short series of segments entitled Dealing with Financial Difficulties. Last week we covered Divorce. This week we will discuss losing a job.Another emotionally difficult life and financial issue is losing your job. It’s hard to keep your wits about you when you hear the news, but the calmer you can stay, the faster you can take necessary steps to move towards a better day.Assess- What do you have in the bank? How much do you owe this week? What might you have been in the middle of buying that needs to be stopped? House, car, furniture, communicate with the shop right away. Are you eligible for unemployment benefits? If so, apply immediately. You will want to investigate carrying over your health insurance – if your job was vital to the family’s coverage and investigate COBRA. This allows you to buy group rate health insurance for a limited time.Communicate- Let friends and family know the situation as soon as possible so that ears can be listening for job openings and opportunities. Communicate with utility companies and others about your situation. Many of them, when made aware of the situation, will do whatever they can to work with you, as long as you communicate! New direction- Is this an opportunity to go back to school or change your skills? Is your former job in an ailing industry or is this just a temporary setback? Try to take a reasonable and unemotional view of the future. Stay active even if is in small opportunities. You need to not be home sulking but working wherever you can doing whatever you can find. Stay positive, stay focused on others so you can get plenty of rest and get going tomorrow. It will all work out!Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.comCheck out or website that includes weekly streaming video.WWW.NorumbegaFinancial.comVoted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of AmericaIn compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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“The Real Deal: Making Big Changes With Small Change”

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion SyversenNot everyone enjoys finance, though as this segment of the news states I think Finance is FUN! To try to help, and with the encouragement of WABI-TV5 staff, I wrote a book that mixes ‘Finance with Chocolate SauceTM’ and also includes home and garden improvement tips.What’s the book about?Making your money count by understanding some cost-cutting and savings tips for your present- home and garden improvement- and your future- retirement planning.Will it hurt to read?NO! And there are plenty of pictures and graphics. Plus it has plenty of ‘Marionisms.’Who’s the reader?Well, it’s for folks at any age who want some encouragement. I spoke to a Senior Symposium in Boston and will be speaking to college students. You read it Catherine. Who do you think would like it?Where can I buy the book?Amazon or for autographed copies www.MarionSyversen.com I can speak for no cost to you church or group. Contact me on the web site to register.Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Ahead of Your Time: Financial & Legal Planning Issues to Consider

Updated 1 year ago

Life is not all lollipops and sunshine. You already pragmatically address some of the daily down-side issues of life with the purchase of Band-Aids and toilet paper. But what do you need to plan for your ultimate earthly future?In the book Ahead of Your Time authors and local business owners, Dick and Sue Coffin, provide stories, insights and specific planning strategies to take control, of your final arrangements. Though this is an vitally important topic it is often ignored. Planning is the best gift you can give to your grieving loved ones. This week and next we will cover some of the tips offered in this essential book. (Available from Rogan’s Memorials and at www.aheadofyourtime.net Why do this, go through the trouble of having these decisions made? Anyone who has had a loss, be it sudden or after a long illness know that the trauma is enough to deal with. This is no time for arranging a large event, and that what a funereal can be. Control your future, show your love, whichever way you interpret this, pre-planning for you passing and the subsequent arrangements is really an act of love! (And it can save money.) Financial – If you were gone today, would your family know what bills to pay? Would they have money to pay those bills? Years from now would they still be okay or would your estate be eaten up in taxes? There are many aspects to getting your financial house in order for your heirs not least of which are the day to day concerns as well as leaving money for special needs family members or your charitable interests. Have annual family business meetings to help loved ones ‘be on the same page’ concerning the bills and papers required to run the household. List bank accounts, investment holdings and the location of important papers on a pad of list and share that information with your trusted loved ones. make copies for you attorney or executor. Check on your life insurance that your family will be provided for including college for kids or grandkids if that is your intention. Make sure that beneficiaries named on insurance for or annuities and investment accounts are current! These accounts bypass any will or other document and will go to your mother, even if you are married but forgot to change your beneficiary’s name! Legal- Is a will or trust the best vehicle for transitioning your goods to your family? Do you have the legal documents to appoint someone to speak for you in your final days if you cannot speak for yourself? Do you want your grieving spouse to be responsible for everything during the loss? May not. But you need to plan to lift these burdens from your loved ones in a time of loss and pain. For more information see the book Ahead of Your Time, by Sue and Dick Coffin available at www.Aheadofyourtime.net Citations: Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated. Norumbega Financial and all other individuals and companies referenced are separate entities, independently owned and operated

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Ahead of Your Time

Updated 1 year ago

Life is not all lollipops and sunshine. You already pragmatically address some of the daily down-side issues of life with the purchase of Band-Aids and toilet paper. But what do you need to plan for your ultimate earthly future? In the book Ahead of Your Time authors and local business owners, Dick and Sue Coffin, provide stories, insights and specific planning strategies to take control, of your final arrangements. Though this is an vitally important topic it is often ignored. Planning is the best gift you can give to your grieving loved ones. This week and next we will cover some of the tips offered in this essential book. (Available from Rogan’s Memorials and at www.aheadofyourtime.net Why do this, go through the trouble of having these decisions made? Anyone who has had a loss, be it sudden or after a long illness know that the trauma is enough to deal with. This is no time for arranging a large event, and that what a funereal can be. Control your future, show your love, whichever way you interpret this, pre-planning for you passing and the subsequent arrangements is really an act of love! (And it can save money.) Arrangements- I know you have opinions, and have ‘tsk tsk’-ed at the arrangements of others. Well, now’s your turn to plan your arrangements. Do you want to be cremated, have your ashes spread, or buried? Do you want a memorial service or a Mass, or both? Do you want a loud party or a solemn time for loved ones? Plan your service. You can make your arrangements as specific as you’d like with music chosen and the coffin. Compare funeral homes and find one that you like that has a great reputation in the community. Communicate your plans with close family members or friends and then rest easy. Markers- Anyone who has chosen furniture, built a house of done outdoor work knows that nature dwarfs our structures. If you want a stone or marker for a grave site, Sue and Dick suggest walking respectfully through cemeteries with a tape measure and measuring the size of stones or markers that you like. When you are in a little shop the markers appear much larger than they look out in a large cemetery. These are the kinds of things to consider when preplanning. What kind of stone do you like? Do you want an engraving, which is done in great detail by large computers, to reflect you love of sports or family? Make that image part of your plan. Your site- You may know in what cemetery you want to be buried but have you checked if there are any available plots for sale? Do you want to secure enough area for the kids, spouses and grandkids? Are you hoping to be buried in a cemetery that supports you religious beliefs? How many markers or stones are allowed per lot? These and other questions are listed in Ahead of Your Time and these are the answers you need to plan. Citations: and the book. Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure (same for both weeks but longer than normal disclosure):Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated. Norumbega Financial and all other individuals and companies referenced are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Five Stages of Retirement

Updated 1 year ago

Getting ready for retirement and our years in retirement, which thanks to longer lifespans, now account for a lot of years and work best with important planning. Here’s a look at of the typical journey. Fantasy- The 15 years before retirement people begin to fantasize about what they’ll do – on not do – in retirement. This group have high expectations but according to studies, less than half in this age group believe they are saving enough. Excitement- 5 years before retirement there is a growing excitement. In surveys, people have what I would consider, unrealistic expectations about how great retirement will be. As one researcher put it, “Boy, when I get out of work, I’m going to be soooo happy!” The Big Day – The next 2 – 15 years is a readjustment of your previous expectations. Optimism drops from 80% to less than 65%. 25% of retirees are totally confused about their role in life. Peace- comes about 15 years into retirement. It could come way earlier than that for others. (Your emotional readiness and preparation plays an important role in your contentment.) Later Years- Three times as many retirees worry about paying for health care as worry about dying. Plan with that concern in mind. Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Teaching Teens about Credit

Updated 1 year ago

We spoke a couple of weeks ago about the changing credit card laws that will restrict issuance of cards for anyone under 21. So how can you help younger students learn good credit habits? here are a few suggestions from the Wall Street Journal. Test Drive a Debit Card- I’ve spoken with middle school kids explaining to them the difference between credit cards and debit cards because they appear the same to the unschooled or inexperienced. But we know that debit cards draw money from a bank checking account. If you can teach kids to manage a debit account, that could be a good first step in helping them get the hang of not using cash. Authorized user of one your card- the author of the WSJ article suggests that making the child an authorized user of ‘one or more of your cards’ – I can’t imagine why they’d need to be an authorized user of more than one card, but in this way the ‘payment history of the card will appear on the child’s credit file and help him or her build a good credit history-assuming, of course, that the parent handles the card responsibly,’ according to the article. Secured Credit card- secured cards put cash down. They are like a pre-paid phone and allow you to use only up to the amount deposited with the credit card. If you pay the bill you have whatever available credit remains and you are able to establish credit history. A few years of these ‘guardrail’s can really help kids get a more solid footing and help them with their credit futures. Citations:WSJ Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videoswww.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial, Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. and the Wall Street Journal are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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From Two Incomes to One

Updated 1 year ago

Family living on one income might be a decision made because of values or a situation thrust upon you because of circumstance. Either way, these tips will help you live well on less. Be thoughtful – Think about the family’s real needs. If you consider earlier generations and how people in other countries live you’ll realize that cable is not a necessity. Convenience foods, some paper products, downloaded music and frequent movie rentals may need to be eliminated from the budget. How many cell phones are really needed and is texting really necessary? Homemade lunches are yummy! Proud to be frugal- Not proud because you are superior to others, but don’t be ashamed to simplify life so that owning and maintaining stuff has become your reason to go work every morning. Be organized- With someone staying home as their new job, make time to plan menus, make homemade meals and get to the library for the movies and magazines available for free. Make-ahead meals cooked in bulk saves energy but to do that you need to plan. Be creative- Involve the whole family by letting the kids in on the cost cutting. As it gets darker earlier, help them make a game of shutting off lights in rooms when no one is using them. Make homemade pizza and have game night instead of more costly pursuits. Maybe other families will have a game swap so that you can pass along games that you have played and trade those for ‘new’ games. have the kids help cutting cost at the grocery store by unit shopping and coming up with healthy snacks ideas. Get involved volunteering in the community to help families who may be worse off than you so you can foster a selfless attitude in everyone. Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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New Credit Card Laws

Updated 1 year ago

If you hold a credit card you’ve probably noticed that you rates have increased. That’s in anticipation of legislation signed May 22nd that became effective August 20th. Regulations are phased in and the final portions take effect February 22, 2010.Wonder how your increased rate compares with others? According to the Washington Post Pew researches reviewed the lowest advertised rates of nearly 400 credit cards and found that they rose two percentage points, a 20 percent increase, since December. 45 day notice- for rate hike or other significant changes- you can decline the rate hike and pay off the card. Any new charges to the card would be at the new rate. Old requirement was 15 days notice. Bills arrive – the old rule was 14 days until the bill was due, the new rule is 21 days Rate increase for late payment AFTER 60 days instead of effective immediately and must be lowered after 6 months of paying on time. Under 21- Co-signers for those under age 21- and credit card companies on college campususes must disclose agreements with those schools and no ‘free gifts’ for signing up. Other inclusions: Bill will indicate when the balance will be paid off at the present rate. Payments will be applied to highest rate balances- such as a cash advance. Citations: co-signers no free stuff Discussion of effective dates  Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc.Email management, archiving monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc.In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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1 Minute Business Tips – Going Back to School

Updated 1 year ago

Why going back to school is good for businessIt’s that time of the year again — back to school time! If you’re currently in business or considering starting a business now is a great time for you to head back to school! Like anything your chances for success in business can be greatly improved with education. Here are five other reasons why going to school is good for business.One – Small businesses classes can teach you specific things you need to know to successfully start and run a business.Two – By taking a class you can more easily figure out what parts of your business you do well and what parts you should have others do for you.Three – You’ll meet small business experts and service providers who can become great resources for you going forward.Four – Speaking of resources – small business classes are a great way to learn about the many resources and programs that exist to assist small businesses.Five – By attending classes you’ll meet and network with other like minded individuals.To find a class near you check with your local Chamber of Commerce, economic development agencies, colleges and universities and this website www.mainebusinessworks.comSo grab your lunch box and get back to school!I’m Deb Neuman for WABI TV 5 News

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Books for Kids on Money

Updated 1 year ago

By- Marion Syverson Berenstein Bears – “Trouble with Money”, “Dollars and Sense” and “Think of Those in Need” are three of the Berenstein Bears series of books that teach children (suggested ages 4- 8) about a variety of ways to understand the topic of money. Those familiar with the series may know that other titles such as “The Trouble with Chores”, may also tie into the money lesson. Cat in the Hat- This series called The Cat in the Hat Learning Series includes the title, “One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent, New Cent” (suggested ages 4-8)  and explains the history of money, bartering, currencies, banking and paying interest. The Everything Kids Money Book- For ages 9-12 this book with games and simple graphics, explains a plethora of money subjects such as minting coins, coin collecting, banks, interest, allowances, borrowing, practicing charity and how to shopping a sale. Since books of this kind are generally not big sellers local outlets seldom have them readily available. But they can easily be ordered. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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Deb Newman Talks about Fusion Marketing

Updated 1 year ago

On a recent vacation I was shopping downtown and made a purchase at a retail store. When I checked out the owner gave me a coupon for 10 % off several other downtown businesses and suggested why they were great places to visit. It worked! I went right next door and enjoyed a great lunch for 10% off and visited a gallery I hadn’t planned to visit! This practice of businesses sending customers to each other is called Fusion marketing. Here are tips for making fusion marketing work for you…One – Identify businesses that share the same customers as you but who aren’t in the same business as you. Examples include stores, restaurants and museums partnering, landscapers with builders, wedding photographers with florists and so on. Two – Determine what each participating business will offer the customers.Three – Write up a simple agreement between the partnering businesses that states what role each will play and what they will offer.Four – Develop marketing materials to promote the program benefits to customers.Five – Combine customer mailing lists with your partners and get the word out via email, the web, word of mouth and flyers.In today’s economy fusion marketing is a great way to work collaboratively with other businesses to bring business to both your doors at little or no cost.Try it and see what happens!I’m Deb Neuman for WABI TV5 News

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Kids, shopping and learning about money

Updated 1 year ago

When I was a kid and the family would drive by a school- any school- I would hold my breathe until we’d pass it. It wasn’t learning that bugged me, it was the routine of school. But it’s getting to be that time again: time for school shopping. We’ve talked before about helping kids learn about money by giving them budget information so they can take an active role in making purchasing decisions. They will also learn about every family’s finite school budget. Don’t think they will be traumatized by the information. They will be empowered and will prioritize what item of clothing or technology really deserves a higher level of expenditure. Spending is becoming the activity of choice among kids- Born to Buy, by Juliet B. Schor, compiles some alarming trends with kids and shopping. American kids, according to Schor, believe ‘that their clothes and brands describe who they are and define their social status.’ She goes on to state that, ‘Children’s social worlds are increasingly constructed around consuming.’ (Emphasis mine.) Schor cites data compiled in 1997 showing how kids spend their time. Kids – ages 6 – teens- spend about 2.5 hours shopping per week. That is many times what they spend per week in art, talking to family, reading, outdoors, and studying. It is also more time than they spend in religious activities. (Younger children spend even more time shopping.) Kids might know a lot about stores and ‘cool brands’ but they have little idea on how much money is available for school shopping and how that compares to the long list of things they want. Just a reminder, don’t take any griping about the size of the shopping budget as a personal insult. Kids may whine about a lot of things, it doesn’t mean anything personal. Here are a few ideas for helping kids learn about money during school shopping trips: Have a shopping strategy- talk about the size of the budget before you head out to the stores. Use the internet or store fliers to get an idea of the prices of hoped-for items. Prioritize- How many outfits can be made from the separates you’re planning – or thinking- of buying? Go to the library, or check the internet, or have a fun day with friends making new outfits from just a few pieces of clothing. Be Sensitive- It is the culture of kids to feel that their WORTH comes from the brand. It is not correct that they feel this way, but they feel this way regardless. Help them know that their worth is intrinsic. Juliet B. Schor, Born to Buy, page 13 Schor, pg.11Schor, pg. 30 Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out our website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2009 by Market Surveys of America —————–In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial and Wall Street Financial Group, Inc., are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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1 Minute Business Tips – Reducing Procrastination

Updated 1 year ago

A recent study conducted by a Professor at the University of Calgary indicates that we’re procrastinating more than we used to. The study shows that back in 1978 -fifteen percent of us were guilty of it. Today that number is more like sixty percent. If you find you’re among the many saying “I’ll do it later” here are five tips to help you step procrastinating and get it done now!One – Tackle the hardest things you have to do first thing in the day. That way they won’t be nagging at you and you’ll feel better knowing it’s done and out of the way.Two – Schedule time on your calendar to take care of a task you’ve been putting off and only focus on that task until it is done.Three – Post reminders everywhere. A post it note by the front door, on your fridge your laptop or dashboard will not only remind you about something you need to do but all those notes may annoy you enough to get it done!Four – Enlist support from others. Ask a friend, partner or colleague to remind you about a task you need to get done. A little peer pressure can go a long way in reducing procrastination.Five – When you accomplish that task you’ve been putting off. Reward yourself! Chocolate ice cream can be a great motivator to get something done that you’ve been putting off!I’m Deb Neuman for WABI TV5 News

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Online Budget Tools

Updated 1 year ago

I recently received a question from a client about tools to help her daughter figure out her budget. Here are some online tools to help. Mint- is a popular, free tool that links your investments with your checking accounts and bills to help you see how you are doing on spending and savings goals. The service is free because sponsors pay for the privilege of selling you on a cheaper mortgage, higher interest rate savings account, etc. Those sponsors don’t have direct access to your info, but Mint interacts with you on their behalf suggesting cheaper loans. The service is free and confidential. Buxfer – also free and a direct competitor with Mint, Buxfer has a secret storage place using Google to help you feel even safer. It does the same things with some interesting add-ons such as Twitter and is also iPhone accessible. There are several other online services available as well as Excel-compatible programs. Not much work to have a good vision of your finances. Being organized saves money! Marion R. Syversen, MBA – PresidentNorumbegaFinancial207.862.2952Marion@NorumbegaFinancial.com Check out or website that includes weekly streaming videosWWW.NorumbegaFinancial.com Voted Bangor’s Best Financial Planning Firm 2008 by Market Surveys of America In compliance with requirements from FINRA, all e-mail sent via the WSFG domain will be subject to review and archiving by Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Email management, archiving & monitoring technology powered by Smarsh, Inc. Disclosure:Only securities and advisory services offered through Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Norumbega Financial, Wall Street Financial Group, Inc. and all other companies listed herein are separate entities, independently owned and operated.

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1 Minute Business Tips – Risk

Updated 1 year ago

There is one four letter word that every entrepreneur is familiar with – that word is risk!The key to success as an entrepreneur isn’t necessarily having a high risk tolerance – it’s more about having confidence in your ability to manage risk and being flexible enough to handle challenges. To assess your ability to manage the risk associated with starting or expanding a business ask yourself these 5 questions.One – Are you confident your business will succeed? Have you conducted the research necessary to determine if a market exists and that you can you compete with your competition? Two – Are you able to adapt to change and persevere if things don’t go exactly as planned? Three – What do you stand to lose if the business fails and are you willing to risk that? This could include money, personal and business assets, even relationships.Four – If you have a family, consider how they will tolerate the risk and challenges associated with operating a business.Five – Does taking risk thrill you or scare you to death. If you know it will keep you up at night with worry – you might want to reconsider.Risk can be a very good thing. Great rewards can come to those who take risks. Keep in mind that most successful entrepreneurs take calculated risks not foolish ones. I’m Deb Neuman for WABI TV 5 News

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