Alpacas on the Rise: Unity Farm Draws Public

Erica Stapleton

Updated 3 months ago

“Sharing alpacas with people and educating them on what they’re for what they do what we utilize them for is our passion.”

Corry and Robin, co-owner’s of Northern Solstice Alpaca Farm in Unity, look to offer everyone a true Maine Alpaca experience.

“We love coming to the alpaca farm,” says Marjorie Goodwin, who is visiting from Massachusetts with her family.  “They’re so beautiful.  It’s just a great day out and then when we saw online that they had the babies, we had to come and meet the babies.”

“This little girl is Sperry. She’s just four days old.  They say baby alpacas grow a half pound to a full pound for the first 30 days, so Sperry is right on track.”

“It’s like spring all the time when we have baby coming,” Corry says. “It’s just that feeling of life and happiness.”

There are several perks to growing the herd.

“When we grow, we’re growing our store were filling our store with products from this luxury fiber,” explains Robin.  “If you haven’t worn alpaca, you’re missing out.”

Corey and Robin have an alpaca store on the farm site. They think an alpaca trend could be on the rise.

“They’ve only been in the United States for 35 – 40 years now.  “We’re really in the infancy in the alpaca world and we’re going to be on the pioneer end,” Corry explains.  “But we’re looking to grow the alpaca industry to the point where cotton or wool is now.”

They even have a boarding system that serves as an easy way for other people to benefit from the animal.

“People can actually purchase an alpaca from us and for $5 a day we take care of everything and that includes the good and the care,” Robin shares.

“My wife actually convinced me to come out because she’s interested in the alpacas,” says Waterville visitor Andrew Schoening.  “I think it gives a great opportunity for someone like my wife that would like to have an alpaca and be involved.  We live in Waterville, so we can’t really have and alpaca in our yard.”

“In the economy, the way it is right now,” Corry says.  “Any way we can help the economy, and these alpacas will do that.”


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