Town Officials In Norridgewock Consider Security Cameras To Catch Vandals

Rob Poindexter

Updated 1 year ago

Folks who live and work in Norridegwock are fed up with the thefts and vandalism taking place in that town. Now, town officials are considering ways to put a stop to it.Earlier this week, the town’s library was broken into and $500 worth of merchandise was stolen. A few weeks ago, someone in an all-terrain vehicle drove through the gates of a local park and pushed a portable toilet into the Kennebec River. These are just the latest in a rash of incidents that have town officials thinking seriously about installing cameras and better lighting to help police catch those responsible. “We rely on physical left at the scene, witnesses, the neighborhood, things of that nature to work a case. Cameras more times than not expedite our investigations,” said Deputy Chief Dale Lancaster of the Somerset County SheriffsThose who work at Yorks Market in Norridgewock say the problem of vandalism in the town is widespread and getting worse.”We’ve had people take mayonnaise packets from Cumberland Farms and step and smush them so it’s all over Main Street,” said Alicia Luce, who has worked at York’s Market for more than three years. “We have to put chains on the trash cans now because people like to take those, tip them over strew them all over the place. No businesses on Main Street can have flowers or signs or anything nice like that because the kids and people who have nothing better to do will come and destroy it.”Luce and her co-workers are very much in favor of cameras being installed in the town.”It’s a he-said she-said thing and it always has been. With cameras we’ll be able to pin-point exactly who it is and do something about it.”Early estimates say the cameras would cost the town roughly $20,000. Law enforcement in Somerset County say with or without cameras, Norridgewock residents are vital in solving many of these cases.”The police cannot solve crime without community help,” Lancaster said. “The community are the eyes and ears for the police and if they do see that type of behavior going on it’s good that they give us a call.”


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