Mustangs in Harmony

Updated 6 years ago

Wild mustangs are usually found in the western sections of the country, but there are a few here in Maine, on Karina Lewis’ ranch in Harmony.

She’s the liaison between the federal government, the Mustang Heritage Foundation, and the residents of Maine.

&quot:When you bring horses and people together, it’s natural: it doesn’t need any encouragement, it’s spontaneous.&quot: Lewis told TV5 on Wednesday. She says wild mustangs are in danger, since there’s not enough land out west to accommodate them. &quot:We’re over capacity and those numbers double every other year.&quot:

The government has to put extras in pens and hope they are adopted. However, since adoption numbers are down, they say they might have to euthanize some animals due to mounting costs.

It costs $125 to adopt a mustang that has been &quot:gentled,&quot: or trained to be around people. One such horse is Shogun, whom Lewis has been working with on her farm for about three months.

Shogun was a wild three-year old when he was paired with Lewis, for the Extreme Mustang Makeover. A competition in Texas next week that raises money for wild mustangs. Lewis was given a 100 days to train Shogun and will auction him off in Texas next week.

Call her a &quot:horse whisperer&quot: if you will, but Lewis says horses have a lot to teach.

&quot:Horses are extremely good team players and leaders. They embody simple concepts like forgiveness, putting in for a team effort, unconditional love.&quot: Lewis says horses have given us so much, now it’s our turn to help them. &quot:We do have the capability of taking these horses from holding pens and placing them into homes.&quot:

Karina Lewis just found out she might not be able to make the trip to the competition after all, after some of her travel arrangements fell through.

If you’d like to help Shogun get to the competition and find a permanent home, Bangor Savings Bank is taking donations, under the name &quot:Adopt a Mustang.&quot:

Proceeds from the Texas competition go to the Mustang Heritage Foundation.


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